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BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0350

IBM 650 RAMAC

IM RAMAC 650 Data Processing Machine MANUFACTURER International Business Machines Corporation Photo Photo by International Business Machines Corporation APPLICATIONS Manufacturer General purpose, applicable to scientific and business data processing. "In-line" processing with IBM RAMAC 650. The IBM 650 is a basic magnetic drum data processing machine with an DE 355 random access memory unit. This memory is a storage medium in which any group of data may be reached quickly and directly, despite the fact that the data is stored in the memory in a random fashion. The RAMAC 650 was one of the first of IBM's line of machines designed for high-volume, in-line processing of business data. Instead of accumulating data to be processed in batchqs, each transaction is processed as it happens and, at the same time, every related record in the memory unit is adjusted. U. S. Army Engineer District Located in the Faidley Building, 121 South 16th Street, Omaha, Nebraska. The system with drum storage and card input- output is used for earthwork cut and fill, survey computations, stability analyses (spillway weirs, walls, powerhouse and spillway chutes), flood routing, reservoir regulation, grain size computations, and sediment load studies. U. S. Army Engineer Research & Develop. Lab. Located at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The system with drum storage and card input-output, is used for the computation of problems in all fields of engineering in connection with Research and Development of military items for the Corps of Engineers, plus a small amount (less than 5,%) of data processing in connection with labor distribution costs and similar reports. U. S. Army Engineer Waterways Exper. Station Located at Vicksburg, Mississippi. The system with drum storage and card input-output, is used exclusively for engineering and scientific applications. The Computer Center is a joint facility of the Waterways Experiment Station (WES) and the Lower Mississippi Valley Division (LMVD) of the Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army. It operates as a central (center-type) facility to provide electronic data processing and computation services to six (6) using field offices of the Corps of Engineers. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army Engineer Division. Located at North Pacific Custom House, Portland 9, Oregon, the system is used primarily for scientific and engineering work arising in conjuction with the Corps of Engineers construction program in the North Pacific Division. Some typical programs are: Program computes grounding mat resistance vs. cost per number of ground rods for selected resistivities, ground rod spacings and ground rod lengths. Program derives information for plotting the flux distribution in core form transformers for nonsymmetrical coil arrangements or non-uniform current densities. Program computes the neutral axis of a reinforced concrete section of any shape subjected to any combination of axial load, P, and bending moments, Mx and y and computes the concrete and steel stresses. The program can be used for stability analyses and base plate stress analyses, etc., with proper formulation of input data. Computes backwater or water surface profile in an open channel by the standard-step method for velocities less critical. The program computes water surface elevations and balances energy equation to the desired accuracy. Program derives the streamflow from snowmelt and or rainfall over various segments of the Columbia River Basin, by routing water thru basin, lake, and channel storage thereby determining streamflow at gaging station's for reservoir regulation of design
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0351
Photo Photo by U.S. Army Anniston Ordnance Depot flood studies. Monthly forecasts of water year and residual volumes of river flow are prepared for 132 river stations in the Columbia Basin and coastal areas, for purposes of power, irrigation, flood forecasting and control. The program computes forecasts and prepares page formats for publication. The program simulates a basin-wide hydroelectric system of up to 60 projects, giving power output, storage and regulated streamflow data for the projects. Input to the routines are project characteristics, streamflow network, periodic unregulated streamflows, and storage changes at the projects. A sequence of up to six storage projects may be designated for use in firming the system to a pre-specified energy load for each period. Program 1050.4 is for a 650 with 4000 words of internal storage memory. This program simulates a hydroelectric system of up to 20 projects on a given river and its tributaries. The program output gives total discharge, spill, turbine discharge, forebay and tailwater elevations, head on power plant, and actual station generation, number of units on the line for each of the projects, and the total system generation. Variable input data are as follows: desired generation, local inflow, required spill and miscellaneous water use. Time interval for input data is variable and time interval for output data is variable; however, hourly data will ordinarily be computed. Flows are routed between projects, either through reservoirs or open channel reaches. Routing constants and power plant characteristics are included in the program along with minimum and maximum pool elevation but may be changed as desired. Program determines the total energy in kw-months, mean monthly capability in kw, average number of operating units and mean head associated with a sequence of mean monthly flows at a hydro-generating plant. Plant performance is based on turbine unit performance characteristics and generator losses contained in tables in memory and a constant value of transformer efficiency. Computes cut and fill, adjusted cut, accumulated cut and fill, mass ordinate and slope stake reference data where required, based upon original ground and finished ground conditions. The computation of earthwork quantities and preparation of design roadway templates and profile grades are processed. The stations and elevations of the verticle P.I.'s together with the length of verticle curves, and the station of the points of spiral and horizontal curves, the roadway typical section data and original ground data are used as information including a five line profile. The design template information may in turn be used in the quantity computations program above, to compute volumes and slope stake reference information.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0352
Photo Photo by U.S. Army Engineer District, Omaha The program computes the profile grade for a highway including verticle curve corrections. The input data consists of the P.I. stations, elevations, and length of verticle curves. U.S. Army Engineer Supply Control Office Located at 410 North Broadway, St. Louis, Missouri, the system with drum, tape and cards, is used for integrated stock and fiscal accounting. Stock Accounting Processing world wide customer demands and supply transactions in such a manner as required to maintain individual item stock balances, on a consolidated accountable property record, on all Engineer items stored within the continental United States. Financial Inventory Accounting Provides the monetary values of issuance, receipts and adjustments, as recorded against stated inventory balances of the accountable property records into a directed pattern of reports. Stock Fund Accounting Compiles computed dollar values of Stock Fund inventory balances and transactions into a designated chart of accounts as required to maintain a "balance sheet type record" of the Engineer Section of the Army Stock Fund. Customer Billing The preparation of printed bills to customers for all reimbursable issues of inventory items. Computed requirements of organizations and units as prescribed in TOE's, TA's or other governing directives. This involves file maintenance routine of constantly changing requirements by addition and deletion action. Mobilization Reservation Requirements A process of compiling projected inventory requirements of individual item needs based on various degrees of mobilization. World Wide Asset Data An accumulation of statistics relative to the quantity, location, condition and net worth of all inventory items. Integrated Supply Control of Minor Secondary Items The process of measuring requirements against known assets for purposes of projecting a supply position and signifying actions required such as procurement, excesses, etc. Item Identification and Cross Reference Files Describing for Supply Control purposes, the item name, description and characteristics in the detail necessary to adequately inform potential customers of items available.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0353
Photo Photo by U.S. Army Engineer Research & Dev.Laboratories U. S. Army Ordnance Located in Bldg. 109-1, Inventory Control Division, Field Services Group, Philadelphia, Pa. The system with drum, core, and tape storage and tape and cards input-output, is used for daily updating National Availability Inventory Records, requests for material, catalog changes, determination of requirements, computation of digital levels, distribution and redistribution of stock, financial inventory accounting report, demand, issue and returns summaries, stock status reports, computation of basic loads, maintenance and usage of application file, in stock, technical service excess and disposal reports, file maintenance, and procurement status. U. S. Army Ordnance Located in Bldg. 353, Feltman Res. & Engineering Laboratories, Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, N. J. The system with drum and cards, is used for Interior Ballistics burning-rate studies and projectilepropellant dynamics), (3-degree of freedom trajectories, inertial fuzing studies, and stability calculations), (lethal area calculations and systems analyses), design calculations, and use terminal ballistics data reduction. U. S. Army Ordnance Located in Bldg. 10, Watervliet Arsenal, Watervliet, New York. The system with drum and cards is used for research and engineering, labor control, payroll and leave accounting, and cost accounting. U. S. Army Ordnance Located in Bldg. 362, Anniston Ordnance Depot, Anniston, Alabama. The system with drum, disc, cards, tapes, cores, and typewriters is used for Ordnance Corps Distribution Depot, general supplies secondary items stock control (availability edit and item accounting) and related Financial Inventory Accounting Activities. U. S. Army Philadelphia 4P Depot Located at 2800 S. 20th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. The systems are used for drum, card, tape, RAMAC, typewriter systems, payroll, cost reporting, factory production, procurement on-order, national inventory control, inventory updating, sales and billings, requisition and extract processing, cataloging, supply management, and retail requirements studies. U. S. Army Richmond QM Depot Located at Richmond, Virginia. The systems are used for card, tape system, the card, tape, RAMAC, fund accounting, depot maintenance program, army field stock control system, memorial, motor vehicle, special application, FIA Stock Fund, supply control, civilian payroll, stock accounting, national stock control, supply catalog, cost accounting, troop requirements. U. S. Army Signal Corps School, ADPS Located at Squier Hall, Room 178, Fort Monmouth, N. J. The drum, core, disc, tape cards, typewriter, is used for the training of Staff Officers,
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0354
Photo Photo by U. S. Army Engineer Supply Control Officer. instruction to all Signal Corps Officers, demonstrations to all classes showing capabilities of ADPS, training of Enlisted Programmers and Console Operators, and for the testing of possible programs to be used in the Army. U. S. Navy Service Center Located on the 2nd Floor of the Navy Service Center, Washington 25, D. C., the drum and card system is used for payroll, work measurement, labor distribution, lunar dynamics for the Naval Research Laboratory, and electronic production capabilities statistics. U. S. Naval Air Development Center Located at the Aeronautical Computer Laboratory, Johnsville, Pa., the drum, core, tape and card system is used for scientific computations and scientific data processing. U. S. Naval Avionics Facility Located in Indianapolis, Indiana, the drum, core, card and tape system is used for systems studies, error analyses, calibrations and data reduction. U. S. Navy Bureau of Naval Weapons Located in Temporary "W" Bldg. Rm. 1W09, 18th & Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington 25, D. C., the drum, card, tape system is used for production control, engineering calculations, research calculations, and statistical analysis. U. S. Navy, New York Naval Shipyard Located at Brooklyn 1, New York, the drum and card system is used for payroll, direct labor budget, interim cost, budget vs actual, daily report of costs, weekly and cumulative performance report, pipe stress analysis, tank capacity tables, propulsion shafting. U. S. Navy, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Located at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, the drum card system is used for payroll, personnel, cost accounting and control, production planning and control, and scientific and engineering. U. S. Navy, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Located in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, the drum card system is used for payroll both hourly and per annum rates including leave sick and vacation absences and savings bonds direct labor budget (man-hour estimates versus actual), design and engineering, and workload forecasting (both short and long range. U. S. Naval Supply Center Located in Bldg. 211-3, Data Processing Dept., Oakland, Cal., the drum card system is used for updating, stock status balance cards for inventory control system, civilian payroll, U. S. Savings Bond
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0355
Photo by U.S. Army Philadelphia Quartermaster Depot , accounting for civilian personnel, calculation of EAM rental payment, and sundry management reports. USAF, Headquarters, OCAMA Located at Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, the drum-tape system is used for: commodity class property accounting, method of controlling material by AMC supply depots to worldwide AF activities, maintenance contractors, and other military services. Provides data which enables AMC to administer a timely, accurate and effective supply logistics system. Encompasses item accounting, providing inventory position and various products for effective management of serviceable, reparable, and excess material. Provides by-products which are the basis for dollar accounting and management of AF assets, inputs to other systems for requirements computations etc. Base class property accounting - method for controlling material to support AMC internal depot functions and tenant organizations. System provides data required to enable supply components to administer timely, accurate, and effective material support Otherwise same as commodity class property accounting application. Maintenance engineering management material control integrated management system based upon data which measures and evaluates actual performance against predetermined standards for labor, material and overhead. Consists of (1) work measurement system under which engineered labor standards are developed and maintained and which provides for comparison of standard hours with actual labor hours used to perform the work; (2) production control system which provides for planning, scheduling and controlling the application of manpower, material and facilities for the accomplishment of given workload requirements in the depot maintenance shops; and (3) the standard costaccounting system, which provdes for the accumulation and analysis of both standard and actual dollar costs for labor, material, and overhead identified to the organizational unit which best exercises direct control over the cost elements. USAF Air Material Command Located at Bldg. 33, Bay C, Olmsted Air Force Base, Penna., three drum-core-tape-card systems are used for: prime and base class stock control and distribution. All items stored at Hq MAAMA are recorded on tape in Class Code, stock number and account sequence. These tapes are called Master Balance Tapes. Action processed through the Supply System such as; shipment,
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0356
Photo by U. S. Army Watervliet Arsenal receipts, inventory adjustments, transfers, etc., are processed daily to up date the master balance records. The following output products are generated when processing supply actions: transaction registers, shipping documents (104p1 & 104p3), inventory accounting monetary, material cost, stock fund, balance cards (category I & II only), inventory adjustment registers. Each month the daily transaction registers are consolidated and consumption for each item is recorded. At stock balance reporting time (every 90 days for HiValu and every 180 days for Category II & III) consumption qty is consolidated and selected from tape by item. Also at stock balance reporting time the assets stored at MAAMA are selected from the master tapes. The consumption cards and assets cards are used to prepare the stock balance and consumption report. Every week stock list changes are processed against the master balance tape. This includes stock number changes, unit price changes, procurement source code and expendability-repair cost code changes and unit of issue changes. These changes are generated from USAF stock list catalogues. IAM Reconciliation: This program utilizes M/B tape as input. The output is A/F and/or FSC 20 word record by item, with dollar value extended, total dollar value by account and PSC and overall total dollar value by class. USAF, Air Materiel Command, Asst. for Data Services, Comptroller, these are used to compute the 90 day requirements and 30 day supportability. Products from this tape are: file maintenance to the master tape such as additions, deletions, changes, special requests and stock list changes, purge and transfer list, unidentified item list, AMC 550 Requisition cards, 30 day supportability list, parts shortage list. A quarterly report to show maintenance if their replacement percent in the material standards is a realistic figure. Report consists of actual material, end item production, production count and material standards. A master tape compiled daily to make a monthly report on the cost of all material used by maintenance. A master tape inventory balance which is updated daily by transactions. Stock list changes are processed weekly against this tape. Transaction registers, 550, 550, a card etc., are made daily from this tape. A tape made quarterly to update the unit cost in the material standard master tape. Re-price tape
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0357
Photo by U.S. Air Force Directorate of Statistical Services USAF Mobile Air Material Area Located at Brookley AF Base, Mobile, Alabama, the Bran-core- tape-card system is utilized for: stock control and distribution system, maintenance management system, inventory accounting (monetary system, unit authorization listings, mechanized civilian payroll system, PCAM utilization reporting program, test validation system. These include the processing of Air Force property records for which MOAMA has world-wide responsibility, the processing of MOAMA's maintenance- engineering management system, a program developed for controlling equipment material to operate the base, a program that computes civilian pay and leave for preparation of civilian leave and earning statements, checks, and printing of bonds, a program that computes the PCAM machine utilization, and a program for validating test scores for civilian personnel. USAF Air Materiel Command Located at Bldg. 33, Bay C, Olmsted AFB, Penna., the system is used for implementation of a mechanized payroll system, providing for preparation of civilian payroll checks, bond issuance program and leave and earning statement is scheduled for December 1960. Fields of application include: this program utilizes the IAM daily corrections for IAM daily transactions as input cards. The output cards are daily summary cards and financial detail cards. The scary cards dollar value condition is controlled by the posting control; the group number by weapons code, IAM code, account code. This program utilizes the daily summary cards as input. The output cards are IM periodic summary cards. The dollar value is summarized by PSC within account, within IAM for each class. This program utilizes the IAM periodic summary cards as input. The output cards are LAM monthly summary cards and IAM monthly line cards. The monthly summary dollar value is summarized by IAM within account, within PSC, within class symbol sequence. The monthly IAM line card is summarized by IAM. From TAM opening balance cards and IM monthly summary cards, this program prepares the closing balance cards for the month. The opening and closing dollar values are summarized by condition and by condition within PSC for each class and storage site. From monthly summary cards for the quarter, this program prepares one card showing dollar value for
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0358
Photo by U.S. Air Force Mobile Air Materiel Area the quarter for all items which have coon class symbol, PSC, ownership account, condition code and IAM code This program utilizes LAM opening balance and IAM monthly summary cards, for the quarter, as input cards. The output cards are quarterly supply summary cards and Ate.', summary cards. The quarterly supply summary dollar value is summarized by condition, within TAM, within account, within reporting depot, within controlling depot, within class symbol. AMTT summary dollar value is summarized by fields controlled by account and condition. This program utilizes MPA balance cards as input. The output is IAM reconciliation cards by item, with dollar value extended, all "Q" accounts have only service value extended. This application governs the accurate accumulation and reporting of on-hand assets and consumption data to provide essential information to AMA's, depots, and bases under the AF logistics concept. These reports determine the gross future needs of the Air Force, the items the Air Force can expect from repair, and the stock availability. The information provided by SB&CR's is as follows: Actions that have occurred during a reporting period (issues, condemnations, reparable generations, serviceable returns from overhaul, etc); quantity of assets on hand and their condition; and, location of assets (on- work-order, intransit, reparable shipments, etc). This program takes projected programming data from Hq., USAF (received on classified computer tape) and produces Management reports for the Plans and Program Office at Hq., MAAMA (MAFD). That office, in turn, reflects the aircraft flying hours and engine flying hours by type, model, series of MAAMA prime aircraft and MAAMA prime engines for three fiscal years on a projected basis. This program deals with items as related to specific types, models, and series of aircraft. It applies the quantity per assembly (quantity of this item which is installed on a specific aircraft) to the percentage of application to compute a factor. The percentage of application is the percentage of this particular type, model, and series of aircraft which uses this item, as related to the total number of this type, model, and series of aircraft in the Air Force. The factor is applied to the past and present projected flying hour program data to arrive at the installed
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0359
Photo by U. S. Air Face Patrick AFB flying hour programs for each particular requirement, i.e., stock level hours, repair cycle hours, etc. In a later program various factors are applied to these hours in determining the requirements for cost category II recoverable items. USAF Mobile Air Materiel Area Located at Brookley AFB, Alabama, the drum-coretape-card system is utilized for: stock control and distribution system, maintenance management system, inventory accounting (monetary system, unit authorization listings, mechanized civilian payroll system, PCAM utilization reporting program, test validation system. These include the processing of Air Force property records for which MOAMA has world-wide responsibility, the processing of MOAMA's maintenanceengineering management system, a program developed for controlling equipment material to operate the base a program that computes civilian pay and leave for preparation of civilian leave and earning statements, checks, and printing of bonds, a program that computes the PCAM machine utilization and a program for validating test scores for civilian personnel. USAF San Bernardino Air Material Area Located at Norton AFB, California, the dram-card system is used for: Maintenance Support and Maintenance Management, includes data processing for flow of material programming data; for the computation and forecasting of items of supply required to support current operations and programs; for inventory, utilization, and status of aircraft engines and missiles, for such functions as stock control, inventory warehousing, transportation, requisitioning and back order procedures; for all identifying and cataloging operations such as Federal Conversion Program, AF stock lists, D/A cross reference index, etc; for inventory, utilization, accounting and status of such property as medical-dental, clothing, ammunition, petroleum, oils and lubricants. Maintenance Support and Maintenance Management. Includes data processing concerned with the collection and reporting of labor and production statistics involving work measurement, labor distribution materiel standards and projection; includes data processing for product improvement system such as material failure and "UR" reporting. Financial Management and Accounting System (includes Mechanized Civilian Payroll System, includes data processing concerned with reports developed for the purpose of projecting budget requirements and financial plans; preparation and maintnenace of reports pertain-
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0360
Photo by U. S. Air Force Patrick AFB ing to monetary value of items in stock and in use; maintenance and operating costs of real estate facilities; preparation and maintenance of reports reflecting cost data for both labor and material for all functions; preparation and maintenance of reports reflecting obligation, commitment, expenditure, and status of funds; cost of public work programs and construction activities; preparation of expense report, punched card check program, check reconciliation and other similar processing and reporting activities; and processing of other reports reflecting accounting or financial data for such functions as general accounting, expense accounting, clothing and commissary accouning. Mechanised Civilian Payroll System (Authority: AMC Manual 171- 1, Volume II, Chapter 369-51 and AMC Letter 25-112, dated 29 October 1957. This system provides for the maintenance of punched card pay records for all employees at Norton AFB and within the Hq.,SBAMA. Bi-weekly time and leave records are processed against this master file and time and leave records are updated, employees' pay is computed and pay checks and leave and earning statements are published for each employee. As additional system benefits, year- to-date records of payments are kept and labor distribution data is create for cost accounting purposes. Equipment Management and Data Processing Production Control: includes data processing required in the compilation of unit allowance list and base allowance list; effort required in maintaining the files and preparation of the actual lists and reports; data processing for inventory, utilization and status of vehicles other than aircraft, electronics and communications equipment, and data processing equipment. USAF, Hq., AFSWC, Kirtland AFB Located at Kirtland AFB, Bldg. 499, New Mexico, the drum-card system is used for inventory accounting monetary, appropriations accounting, supply inventory control and maintenance exception time accounting. USAF APGC (PGCS) Eglin AFB Located in Bldg. 100, Room 108, Eglin AFB, Florida, the drum- card system is used for: automatic processing of supply transactions, equipment control, personnel, financial services, and miscellaneous applications. USAF Hq. Directorate of Statistical Services, APO 633, N. Y., N. Y. Located in Wiesbaden, Germany, the drun-core-tape-card system is used for enlisted military personnel accounting and reporting, officer military personnel accounting and reporting, civilian personnel accounting and reporting, manpower authorization system, intelligence data analysis, ground electronics installations, and medical stock fund reporting.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0361
Photo by U. S. Air Force Special Weapons Center USAF Hdqs., MATS Located in Bldg. S-920, Scott AFB, Illinois, the drum-core-tape-card- typewriter system is used for personnel accounting, manpower and organization, materiel, and operations and traffic. USAF Hdqs., Pacific Air Force Located in APO 953, San Francisco, Cal., the drumcore-tape-card system is used is Statistical Services for: personnel application (Military maintenance of complete personnel data on all military personnel assigned to PACAF organizations. Programs include updating of files, error determination, preparation of all mechanized personnel reports required by USAF and PACAF. CMOP application. Maintenance of complete authorization data for unit manning documents of units assigned to PACAF. Programs include updating of files, error determination, preparation of authorization reports required by USAF and PACAF. Miscellaneous. Programs in accounting, UAL and MRAL. These prepare cost reports required by USAF and PACAF. Intelligence applications. USAF Hdqs., PACAF A-3 Directorate of Control Located in APO 953, San Francisco, Cal., the tape-drum-core-card- typewriter system is used in Directorate of Control for operations and intelligence. USAF ROAMA Griffiss Air Force Base Located in the Depot Supply Bldg. No. 1, East Wing, Griffiss AFB, the drum- card system is used for payroll, personnel, mechanized property accounting and inventory accounting management. USAF Hdqs., Strategic Air Command Located in the Offutt AFB, Nebraska, the drum-tape-disc-card system is used for command military personnel accounting (detail command personnel files are centrally maintained and all USAF and SAC required reports and information products are developed there from and command manpower and organization authorization account ing (command authorization information files are centrally maintained and used to develop all reports and information products, including publication of all unit manning documents). USAF 2709th AF Vehicle Control Group Located at 3300 Jackson Ave., Memphis 2, Tenn., the drum-card system is used for stock control and distribution - inventory management, in support of vehicle reporting and control, mechanized 650 payroll system, in support of project count - wall to wall inventory, and in support of work measurement. NASA Flight Research Center, Box 273 Located at Edwards, Cal., the drum-card system is used for aircraft flight data reduction, missile trajectories, theoretical heat transfer and supersonic flow, and cost accounting. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Commodity Stabilization Service, USDA Located at the Evanston CSS Commodity Office., Evanston, Ill., the drum-card-tape-printer system is used for the processing of price support loan and purchase transactions for the 19 states served by this office. This application includes computation of loan and purchase transactions, preparation of settlement statements with farmers and producers, and recordation of accountability for these transactions - approximately 111,000 transactions are processed annually. It is also used for the preparation of precomputing invoices covering warehouse charges due to grain elevators - approximately 4,000 invoices are prepared monthly, and for the preparation of settlement statements of warehousemen covering quantity and quality differences on grain delivered as opposed to ordered for delivery also covers final settlement for warehousing charges - approximately 2,000 settlements are processed per month.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0362
Photo by U.S. Air Force 2709th AF Vehicle Control Group California Division of Highways Located at 1120 "N" Street, Sacramento, Cal., the drum-card system is used for engineering computations, statistical applications, and traffic routing and assignment. U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Coast and Geodetic Survey Located in Room 3009, Dept. of Commerce Bldg., Washington, D. C., the drum-card system is used for scientific applications, including adjustment of surveys (triangulation and traverses), reduction of magnetic observations, adjustment of aero-triangulation, gravity vector components, calculation of flight bearings for check VCR facilities, and for fiscal and budget applications, including payroll and cost accounting. U.S. Department of the Interior Located at Denver Federal Center, Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, Colorado, the drum-card system is used for engineering and scientific computations for problem arising in the investigation, design, construction, and operation of reclamation projects. U.S. Treasury Dept., Internal Revenue Service Located 10th and Constitution Avenues, Washington, D. C., there are three idential systems at Lawrence, Mass., Kansas City, Mo and Ogden, Utah. These are drum-card systems used for mathematical verification of income tax returns, computation of account balances and interest, computation of installments of estimated tax, payroll computations, computation of personnel and machine utilization reports, and computation of man-hour distribution reports. American Airlines Located at 100 Park Avenue, New York, New York, the drum-card system is used for commercial payroll accounting, general accounting, statistical studies, and operations research problems. Bridgeport Brass Company Located at the Ground Floor, 30 Grand Street, Bridgeport 2, Conn., the drum- card system is used for payroll and payroll statisitcs; sales statistics, including customer sales reports, cost of sales reports, and tax reports; inventory, including mill products finished goods.. housatonic avenue plant process, venetial blind strip and components finished goods; and cost accounting at the Housatonic Avenue Plant. Convair, A Division of General Dynamics Located at Convair, Fort Worth, Texas, the system is used for Material Project Status - Semi-weekly File Maintenance. Requires approximately 35 hours of 650 time weekly. Semi-weekly material transaction activity, together with applicable material item balance summary cards at the project level, are processed into the 650 to produce: category and contract transfer detail activity cards, procurement notice detail activity cards, procurement change notice detail activity cards, procurement notice balance reporting cards, contract code error detail activity cards, purchase parts below minimum reporting cards, internally initiated project transfer activity updates the item balances at the project level without producing output detail activity cards, daily transaction activity detail cards priced at standard unit price, updated material item balance summary cards representing effect of input transaction and also internally initiated transactions. Material Project Status Report Dollars, Monthly: Requires approximately 21 hours of 650 time monthly. Photo by U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Denver Material item balance summary cards at the project level, together with applicable master material cards containing standard unit price, realization factors, and class/IYKS codes, are processed as of accounting closing to produce priced detail output deck reflecting standard value of the on hand, on order, open requirements (or order point, and status balances. Commercial/Production Consumption Minimum -Order Point and Economic Order Quantity Calculation, Monthly. Requires approximately 28 hours of 650 time monthly. Card decks representing current material item status, minimum - order point master data, and prior six month's usage are combined at the material item level and processed into type 650 to produce: update usage history, order point quantity adjustment detail cards, procurement notice detail activity cards, as applicable reflecting recommended quantity to procure, procurement notice balance reporting card, on-call sub-purchase order detail activity cards, special notification detail cards, updated material item balance summary cards, commercial project status dollars cards, priced at standard unit price. Material On-Call Sub-Purchase Order, Monthly. Requires approximately 2 hours of 650 time monthly. Material on-call sub-purchase order detail cards, together with applicable on-call vendor name and address masters are processed to produce material on-call sub-purchase order vendor name and address detail cards Material Sub-Stores Project Status, Monthly File Maintnenance. Requires approximately 6 hours of 650 time monthly, material tranaction activity pertaining to sub-stores, together with applicable material substores item balance summary cards at the sub-stores level, are processed into the 650 to produce: Sub-stores transfers, detail activity cards to replenish sub-stores, sub- stores zero stock notice detail cards, sub-stores special notification detail cards, cashed sub-stores transfer detail activity cards, updated material sub-stores item balance summary cards representing effect of input transactions and also internally initiated transactions. Material Detail Parts, Shop Order Requisition Allocation, Monthly: Requires approximately 2 hours of 650 time monthly, card decks representing material cashed requisitions and shop order work order details, cashed requisition and shop order work order group summaries, and requisition master header card data are combined and processed into Type 650 to produce allocated work order summaries cards. Coding Final Labor Distribution, Weekly: Requires approximately 1-1/2 hours of 650 time weekly, this application assigns account numbers and sub-account numbers based on work order numbers and charged department. It also accumulates tenths of hours to develop "Whole Hours" totals. Common Cost Allocation, Monthly. Requires approximately 1 hour of 650 time monthly. Unidentified hours worked are allocated to work order numbers assigned to comon cost distribution. Allocations are made based on the percentage of unidentified hours to the total hours charged to common cost work order numbers. Hourly Retirement Calculations, Yearly. Requires approximately 5 hours of 650 time yearly. Current year's retirement benefits (base and excess are calculated based on hourly rate, hours worked, birth date, and hire date. Total retirement benefits are calculated to date. Master FR/PEO Schedules, Biweekly. Requires approximately 1/2 hour 650 time per schedule. Schedules show the estimated start and completion dates as forecasted by the Facilities Department in comparison to the actual dates recorded by the various departments responsible for completion. The schedules serve management as a guide to sequencing the start of jobs and close follow-up.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0361
Photo by Bridgeport Brass Company Jack Stock Studio The 650 is used for this job in order to take advantage of the "Selective Field" key punching technique, whereby only the individual changes need be key punched rather than a complete line entry. Vendor Quality Performance Rating, Quarterly. Data regarding material and/or parts received from vendors, plus inspection rejection data, are accumulated perpetually. Every three months the previous twelve months's data is calculated, using probability factors to produce: ratings by vendor within a material group, ratings by product type, quality ratings based on effectiveness. The ratings developed by 650 are used as a guide to buying from vendors. Quality Control Engineering Statistics, as Required. Requires approximately 1-1/2 - 2 hours of 650 time per week. Statistics are calculated using IBM 650 library programs and the "Bell Interpretive System." These programs are used in areas of process development, process analysis, process modification, process.contro and departmental quality analysis. Calculations inclu simple correlation analysis, multiple correlation analysis, frequency distribution, averages, and stand- ard deviations, significance tests, average range chart special analysis using "Bell" programming. Sub-Assemb Shop Ordering- Preparing of Travelers, as Required. Cards are pulled from manufacturing parts list deck by segment and lot as required. These cards axe merged with a major component schedule (in punched card form( by item and indenture. The 650 determines and punches into sub-assembly travelers: manufacturing span time, start and completion dates, total quantity ordered, work order number, ship number. Control Assembly Parts List - Engineering Release, Daily. This system employes the "Selective Field" key punching method of up-dating a file of over 650,000 cards on a daily basis. Red pencil changes are entered on parts lists by engineering parts list group. Only the red pencil entries axe key punched into "Change" cards and are matched to the particular line entry by a line serial number. In some cases, a single change card may be used to correct several or even several hundred line entries. Debit and credit material cards are punched where the change affects material ordering. Control totals are prepared manually and balanced mechanically. Tennessee Eastman Company Located in Kingsport, Tennesee, the drm-core-card system is used for equipment design (includes pipe stress analysis, B.W.R. equation of state, network flow analysis, pressure vessel and shell head, heat exchanger, plate to plate analysis, and vapor liquid equilibrium), analysis of control laboratory, experimental, and historical data (includes evolutionary operation, time trend box method, Yates analysis of variance, forecasting by exponentail smoothing, interplaner spacing of HKL plane, differential fourier , synthesis, etc.), and commercial uses (includes construction work load, sales analysis exception basis, sales accounting summaries, operating labor scheduling). The Emerson Electric Mfg. Co. Located at 1567 Salzman Ave., Wellston, Mo., the system is used for engineering and scientific calculations together with data processing related to engineering tasks. Some specific items are missile trajectory calculations, heat transfer, aircraftmissile intercept, prediction of failure rates of complete electronic system and maintaining files of failure reports for reliability evaluation. Cleveland Engine Plants, FOMOCO Located in Cleveland Engine Plant No. 2, Brookpark, Ohio, the system is used for Payrolls and Labor, timekeeping records, hourly payroll reports, salary payroll reports, labor distribution, overtime equalization, personnel records, statistics. Production Control, computation of net requirements
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0365
Photo by Ford Motor Company APS and ERO releasing, receipts, shipments, cycle count adjustments, inventory planning, cycle count control, productive mat. inventory, perished tooling. Cost Accounting, scrap analysis, Mfg. expense ledger, perpetual inventory, accounts payable, accounts receivable, accountable document control, purchase priority variances, direct labor performance, cost of sales production reporting. Controllers's Office, Ford Motor Company Located in the Controller's Office, Box 494, Dearborn, Michigan, the system is used for accounting, production control, quality control, plant engineering, and personnel. Ford Motor Company, Advanced Product Study and Engineering Research Office Located in the Scientific Laboratory and Research Bldg., Engineering & Research Staff, Dearborn, Mich, the system is used in computation relating to engineering design studies, largely in the field of mechanical engineering, and concerned with projection of system performance, stress analysis, vibration studies, gear design, vehicle suspension design analysis, structural rigidity, test data reduction, etc. Various "Basic Research" programs in atomic structure, heat transfer, magnetic properties also use this computer. Harrison Radiator Division, General Motors Corporation Located in Lockport, New York, the system is used for heat exchanger design program (main program). Representative sub-routines of this program are, plate fin geometry for cross flow, temperature check, core weight and volume, and regenerator and oil cooler modifications. Curve fit-quadratic (a series of six quadratic equations to plot the points of a curve). Analysis program, (a series of geometric programs to allow for computation from basic data to finished result of from finished result back to basic data). Institute for Defense Analyses Located in Room 1E871, Pentagon, Washington, D.C. The system is used for war-gaming procedures for evaluating weapons systems, cost accounting,and damage assessment problems. Littauer Statistical Laboratory Located at 94 Prescott Street, Cambridge, Mass. the drum-core-card-tape system is used for statistical problems such as frequency distributions, correlations, regressions, factor analyses,(principal axis, verimax, and obliminrotations) sociograms, etc. Michigan Bell Telephone Company Located on the lst Floor, 23500 Northwestern Hwy., Southfield, Michigan, the system is used for payroll (24000 employees), util. and cost reports of IBM equip., non-management wage survey, com'1 work vol. meas. plan, annual mortality studies, general sales results, general planning forecasts (trunk est., etc.), shifting seas. var. and calendar shifts, linear correlation of time series, traffic point to point study, directory sales results and commisions, traffic Detroit Area Trunk Estimates, trunk adm. weekly results, dial loading report, message unit detail billing study, coil collection scheduling, and traffic observing results. Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation Located at 275 Winchester Ave., New Haven, Conn., the system is used for fuels performance calculations, multi-component equilibria, free energy, isentropic expansion, flame temperature, mollier diagram, mechanical and thermal stresses, statistical analyses, regression analyses, planned experiments, least squares curves, theoretical crystal growth, heat transfer, production machine speed trables, thermocouple temperature tables (Callendar Equipment).
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0366
Photo by Ohio Oil Company The Prudential Insurance Company of America, Electronics Research Division Located at Newark, New Jersey, the system is used for ordinary insurance billing and accounting, agency records and debit insurance, district agencies payroll, mortgage loan accounting, valuation-actuarial, actuarial - statistical calculations. RCA Service Company, BMEWS Project Located at Griffiths Air Force Base, Rome, New York, the drum-card system is used for inventory control, reliability, monetary accounting, procurement, transportation, and engineering. New York Stock Exchange Located at 18 Broad Street, New York 5, N. Y.,the system is used for verification, clearance and settlement of security transactions executed on the New York Stock Exchange. The operations facilitate the physical delivery of securities and payments of money related to security transactions. Services of S. C. C. are rendered to Clearing Members of the New York Stock Exchange and Member Banks of New York Clearing House Association. Sun Oil Company Located at the Marcus Hook Refinery, Marcus Hook, Penna., the system is used for refinery simulation to determine optimum method of operation, process calculation to establish operating conditions, chemical engineering design calculations, analysis instrument data reduction, and marketing statistical analysis. Western Electric Company Located at 77 South Wacker Drive, Chicago, I11., the drum-core-disc-card-tape system is used for the preparation of payroll checks, distribution of payroll, analysis of deductions from pay, processing of cost and billing procedures, preparation of quarterly and year-end State, City and Federal Tax Reports, Pension Pension Statistics and related payroll and deduction report data. Colorado State University Computing Center Located at Fort Collins, Colorado, plans to get an IBM 650 Summer 1960. Columbia University Located at Dobbs Ferry, New York, the drum-card system is used to assist theoretical and experimental research and for the processing of scientific data. Cornall University Located at the Dairy Records Processing Laboratory, Ithaca, New York, the computer and peripheral equipment are used to process monthly DHIA records for about 250,000 cows from 11 northeastern states. The computer is used about 50,% of the time processing this material, 20,% of it's time is spent doing routine analyses such as evaluating sires used in artificial insemination and preparing other research material to be distributed to the DHIA membership involved in the program. The remaining time is utilized in basic and applied research in quanitative genetic, this effects environment and management on dairy production and other analyses of a statistical nature. Indiana University Located at the Research Computing Center, Bloomington, Indiana, the system is used for almost all phases of University Research make use of the Center's facilities. The following are some of the major fields of research using the computer: astronomy: stellar interiors and stellar atmospheres. Chemistry: quantum mechanics, x-ray diffraction. Business and Economics: surveys of markets, executive games. Mathematics: numerical analysis. Psychology: mathematical model studies. In addition, the
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0367
Photo by Socony Mobil Oil Company, Incorporated departments of Political Science Sociolo and the School of Education make great use of the Center. Marquette University Located in the Computing Center, Milwaukee, Wis., the drum-card system is used for research problems from all fields of university endeavor and for student education in programming. Stanford University Located at the Computation Center, Stanford, Cal., the drum-card system is used for the range of interests of an academic community. Syracuse University Located at the Computing Center, 112 Hinds Hall, Syracuse University, Syracuse 10, New York, New York, the system is used for Mathematics: procedures for solving high order complex polynomial equations. Chemical Engineering: explosion pressure calculation. Economics: evaluation of Cobb-Douglas Production for USA and USSR Data. Industrial Engineering: shop scheduling study (Thesis). Industrial Engineering: Statistical Quality Control Study (Thesis). Education: predicition of reading skills. Civil Engineering: analysis of errors in aerial photogrametry. Electrical Engineering: effect of the presence of ferrite posts in waveguides (sponsored). Psychology: study of new ability measuring index (Thesis). Industrial Engineering: calculation of interest factors. Industrial Engineering: reliability of estimates in economics problems (Thesis). General Elect.: Probability of radar tracking of missiles (sponsored by General Electric). Chemical Engineering: study of the Van Laar Equation (Thesis). Niagara Mohawk: study to find optimum operation of a hydroelectric plant (sponsored by Niagara Mohawk). Business Statistics: study of production indices. Physics: relaxation rates. Mathematics: analysis of cosmic ray data (Thesis). Psychology: study of non-linear discriminant functions (Thesis). Elect. Engineering: mutual impedance between individual elements in a large antenna array (sponsored by Rome Air Development Center). Sociology: predicition of hospital prognosis from social factors. Niagara Mohawk: study of gas distribution and transmission systems (sponsored by Niagara Mohawk). Radio-Television: analysis of audience characteristics of viewers and non- viewers of an educational television program series, "Books and Ideas Determination of factors predicitng television program success (sponsored by Schwerin Research Corp. of NYC). Psychology: juvenile delinquency study (sponsored by U. S. Office of Education). Smith Corona: Determination of sales quotas (sponsored by Smith-Corona). Bacterio- logy and Botany: wholesomeness of irradiated foods (sponsored by Army Surgeon General's Office). Education: verbal problem skills in arithmetic (The- sis). Sociology: analysis of community influence systems. Preventive Med. College of Med.: Toxo- plasmosis study (sponsored by State of New York). Elect. Engineering: power loss study (sponsored by Niagara Mohawk). Elect. Engineering: study of examination techniques in electrical engineering. Elect. Engineering: study of interpretive coding scheme with reference to electrical engineering requirements.------preliminary study of linear arrays with non-uniform spacing. Elect. Engineering: Fourier Integral Transform Study (Thesis). Education: relation of selected non-intellectual factors to Over - and Under-Achievement in Several College Groups (Thesis). Pediatrics. Dept. College of Med.:. characteristics of autonomic nervous system function in new born and young infants (sponsored by the State of New York). Elect. Engineering: transformer rating (sponsored by Niagara Mobawk). Psychology: juvenile delinquency study (Thesis).
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0368
Photo by Socony Mobile Oil Company, Incorporated Psychology: background factors and correlates of achievement motivation (Thesis). Elect. Engineering: near-zone antenna field synthesis (sponsored by General Electric). Traffic Commission: ordering of information provided by student traffic cards at S.U. Society of American Foresters, College of Forestry: study of education in forestry and related fields of natural resources management (sponsored by Society of American Foresters). College of Lib. Arts, Office of the Dean: study of the transfer student in the College of Liberal Arts. Elect. Engineering: antenna arrays (sponsored by Rome Air Development Center). Eckerlin and Klepper: study of moment distribution in connection with the design of new dormitory construction at Syracuse University (sponsored by Eckerlin and Klepper). Physics: optical modes in calcite and arafonite crystals (Thesis). Electrical Engineering: computation to obtain graphical representation of equipotential lines outside an elliptical electron beam (sponsored by NSF). Civil Engineering: photographic coordinate measurement errors and their effect on tilt and resection (Thesis). Special Education: Statistical study of results of series of verbal and non-verbal tests given to school children (sponsored). Dept. of Microbiology, College of Med.: population genetics study (sponsored by State of New York). Forest Management, College of Forestry: the predictive validity of two tests with forestry students at Oregon State College (Thesis). Physics: study of bubble chamber tracks (sponsored by AEC). Economics: income distribution (Thesis). Youth Development Center: a study of the characteristics of apprehended juvenile delinquents in Onondaga County (sponsored). Business Administration: management games. Univ. of Hawaii: analysis of sugar cane growth (sponsored by Hawaiian Commercial Sugar Company). Mathematics: study of prime numbers. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, College of Forestry: dilute solution properties of polymers (sponsored by Soc. of Am. Foresters). Mathematics: computational experiments with the conjugate gradient method and other related methods for the solution of systems of linear equations. Niagara Mohawk: evaluation of the place of nuclear power among the power- generating resources (sponsored by Niagara Mohawk). The term "sponsored" indicates financial aid in part or in full from a source outside of Syracuse University. Problems listed for Niagara-Mohawk, General Elec- tric and Smith Corona indicate a cooperative arrange- ment between the Syracuse University Computing Center and the Syracuse Community as a whole. Computing time on our machine is provided occasional- ly for such companies for problems of a research (non-production) nature if time is available at no sacrifice to University users. University of Houston Located at the Computing and Data Processing Center, University of Houston, Houston 4, Texas, the drum-card system is used for education and research in all areas where a computer is useful. Vanderbilt University Located in Wesley Hall, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, the system is used in the research field by the physics, chemistry and astronomy and engineering students for calculations to be used in their theses. Various members in the science departments have used it for problems pertaining to private research work. The medical school has made some use of it, in particular the radioisotope section which uses a routine to interpret the information from their analyzer and calculate the amount of potassium in the human body.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0369
Photo by Western Electric Company, Omaha. The machine has been utilized more for statistical work than any other type of calculations. The psychology, sociology, and economics departments have been most active in this way. For education the machines have been used in the conducting of classes in programming and computing for any interested members of the university community. Yale University Located at the Computing Center, 135 Prospect Street, New Haven, Connecticut, most of the work is done in physics and social sciences by staff members of these departments and by graduate students in these departments doing work toward their degrees. A drum-card system is used. PROGRAMMING AND NUMERICAL SYSTEM Internal number system Decimal Decimal digits/word 10 plus sign Instructions/word 1 Instructions decoded 89 Arithmetic system Fixed point (standard) Floating point is an optional feature (2 digit character, 8 digit mantissa and sign Instruction type One address Modified to include location of next instruction Number range -1010 < a < 1010 Instruction word format +---------------------+-------------+------------------+ | 1 2 | 3 6 | 7 10 | +---------------------+-------------+------------------+ | Sign Oper Code | Data | Location of Next | | | Address | Instruction | +---------------------+-------------+------------------+ Soap, Fortransit, assorted customer programs for general problems (utility routines, etc.) and programs for specific industry needs (engineering, petroleum, etc.). Registers and B-boxes include distributor, upper and lower accumulators, and three index registers. ARITHMETIC UNIT Incl Stor Access Exclud Stor Access Microsec Microsec Add Variable 288(Optimized) Mutt Variable 2,210-19,600 10,000(Optimized) Div Variable 6,000-23,400 12,000(Optimized) Construction (Arithmetic unit only Vacuum Tubes Type Quantity 6350 208 5965 122 6211 132 5687 7 Diodes Type AF 499 Transistors 0 Condensers 231 Arithmetic mode Serial by character Timing Synchronous Operation Sequential
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0370
Photo by U. S. Army Engineer Supply Control Office STORAGE Manufacturer Media No. of Words Access Microsec Magnetic Drum 2,000 or 4,000 96 min 4,800 max Magnetic Core 60 96 Magnetic Tape 500,000 per unit 800,000 max/60 words Magnetic Disk 600,000 RAMAC (650) Magnetic Tape No. of units that can be connected 6 Units No. of char/linear inch of tape 200 Char/inch Channels or tracks on the tape 7 Tracks/tape Blank tape separating each record 1.5 Inches Tape speed 75 Inches/sec Start time 10.8 Millisec Stop time 10.8 Millisec Average time for experienced operator to change reel of tape 180 Seconds Physical properties of tape Width 0.5 Inches Length of reel 2,400 Feet Composition Ferrous coated acetate or mylar Mylar is DuPont's registered trademark for its polyester film. INPUT Manufacturer Media Speed Cards 200 or 250 cards/min Magnetic Tape 15,000 char/sec 150 cards/min may be read from read feed of Type 407 Accounting Machine when attached. A 10-word input buffer is provided which allows computation to proceed for 272 millisec of the 300 millisec necessary to reach a card. A 60-word magnetic core buffer is available between magnetic tape and the magnetic drum. Each of these words of core is addressable between the magnetic tape and the magnetic drum. Each of these words of core is addressable and can be used for rapid access storage when not reading or writing magnetic tape (96 microsec per word access). Tape Prom IBM 702, 704 or 705 Systems can be read by this tape unit. Rewind time for 2,400 feet of tape is 1.2 minutes. The IBM 650 (RAMAC) (355) and the IBM 650 (Tapes) utilize a 537 Read-Punch Unit operating at 155 cards/minute. OUTPUT Manufacturer Media Speed Cards 100 or 250 cards/min Magnetic Tape 15,000 char/sec Line Printer 150 lines/min (wheel type) 120 char/line A 10-word output buffer is provided which allows computation to proceed for 565 milliseconds of the 600 milliseconds necessary to punch a card. A 60word magnetic core buffer is available between the magnetic tape and the magnetic dry. Each of these words is addressable and can be used for rapid access storage when not reading or writing magnetic tape (96 microseconds per word access). Printer connected directly to main fame of computer through a 10 word print buffer. Printer connected to magnetic tape frame, independent of computer. The IBM 650 RAMAC and IBM 650 Tape Systems utilize a 537 Read Punch Unit with a speed of 155 cards/minute.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0371
Photo by University of Arkansas DEMONSTRATION - Dr. James E. Scroggs, computing center supervisor at the University of Arkansas, shows Larry David of Beebe, an engineering student, how the new IBM 650 Computer works. The computing center at the University is the only one in Arkansas. (Caption furnished by U. of Arkansas CIRCUIT ELEMENTS OF ENTIRE SYSTEM Manufacturer Type Quantity Tubes 6350 545 5965 269 6211 296 5726 107 5687 148 12AY7 11 Type Quantity Diodes F 3,302 AP 639 J 2 Transistors 0 Magnetic Cores 3,600 For a RAMAC 650 with 4 disk units and 6 magnetic tape units, the total system requirement is tubes 5,467; diodes 11,428; transistors 211; and magnetic cores 3,600.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0372
Photo by Georgia Institute of Technology RECC CHECKING FEATURES Manufacturer Validity character check (data and instructions), non- existent addresses and order codes, double punch and blank column, overflow of accumulator, divide check, horizontal and vertical parity checks on magnetic tape, magnetic tape to card check. POWER, SPACE, WEIGHT, AND SITE PREPARATION Manufacturer Power, computer 17.7 KVA Volume, computer 270 cu ft Area, computer 45 sq ft Weight, computer 5,656 lbs USA SCO Power, computer 77.8 KVA Power, air conditioner 15.0 KVA Volume, computer 15,030 cu ft Area, computer 1,503 sq ft Room size, computer 17 ft x 69 ft plus 15 ft x 22 ft Floor loading 19 lbs/sq ft 200 lbs concen max Capacity, air conditioner 25 Tons 400 ampere, 4 wire, 3 phase, 60 cycle, 208 volt power supply. Exhaust hoods and ducts on 650, 655, 652, 653, 774. Filter bank. Ductwork connecting existing two ten ton air conditioners to computer room. Two internal partitions removed. USA Phila QM Depot Power, computer Tape 650 52.6 KVA Volume, computer 1,902 cu ft Volume, air conditioner 21,000 cu ft Area, computer 317 sq ft Area, air conditioner 15,000 sq ft Room size, computer 40 ft x 80 ft Room size, air conditioner 100 ft x 50 ft Floor loading 54 lbs/sq ft 186 lbs concen max Capacity, air conditioner 60 Tons chilled water Weight, computer 17,070 lbs Computer Room Floor $ 7,591 Air Conditioning 46,340 Installing I Beams 1,518 Plate Glass Windows 450 Preparation 4,733 Ceiling 1,442 Lighting 3,351 Power 7,498 Cables & Fittings 1,100 Plumbing 170 Plaster 1,022 Total $75,215 Air conditioner used to cool computer room is a 60 ton chill water unit using a 60 RP motor to drive com- pressor, 15 HP motor to, drive condenser and several
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0373
Photo by Indiana University 3 HP units to drive water pumps. This air conditioner is located in a room with a 75 ton unit used to cool the EAM Division. The size of the air conditioning room is approx. 50 ft. x 100 .ft. The floor is concrete. The computer air conditioner is designed in such a way that should it fail, the 75 ton unit will cut off from the EAM room and convert conditioning to the computer room. USN AF Power, computer 39.4 KVA Volume, computer 4o8 cu ft Area, computer 71.8 sq ft Room size, computer 552 sq ft Floor loading 24 lbs/sq ft 900 lbs concen max Weight, computer 13,370 lbs Hood and blower system constructed and installed in ceiling for heat take-off. USAF San Bernardino AMA Power, computer 23 Kw 16.8 KVA 0.86 pf Power, air cond 40 Kw 50 KVA 0.80 pf Volume, computer 196.4 cu ft Area, computer 36.4 sq ft Room size, computer 300 sq ft Floor loading 290 lbs/sq ft Capacity, air conditioner 50 Tons Weight, computer 6,263 lbs Weight, air conditioner 10,500 lbs Site preparation included modification of approximately 1,320 sq. ft. of a permanent type warehouse. The modification consisted of installation of ceiling height partitions, voltage regulators, distribution panels, 50 TR air conditioner on roof of building and necessary duct work. Air conditioning system used jointly with Burroughs 205 Computer System. USAF Hq SAC Power, computer 36.1 Kw 62.7 KVA 0.85 Pf Volume, computer 9,600 cu ft Area, computer 1,200 sq ft Room size, computer 28 1/2 ft x 42 ft Floor loading 22.5 lbs/sq ft 2,972 lbs concen max Weight, computer 21,720 lbs Weight, air conditioner 1,500 lbs Installation of a pedestal floor. Air conditioning plenum. Extension and distribution of existing build- ing power source. Installation of two wall panels of power circuit breakers in the computer area. In- stallation of a small "air handler" to augment the regular main building air conditioning system. Air conditioner is the main building system. American Airlines Area, computer 400 sq ft Weight, computer 6,198 lbs Motor driven ventilating fan with exhaust hoods. Bridgeport Brass Co. Power, computer 17.6 Kw 17.7 KVA Volume, computer 194.7 cu ft Volume, air conditioner 48 cu ft Area, computer 36.1 sq ft Area, air conditioner 6 sq ft Room size, computer 500 sq ft Floor loading 100 lbs/sq ft 1,000 lbs concen max Weight, computer 5,491 lbs Power outlets provided and air conditioner installed.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0374
Photo by University of California LRL Tennessee Eastman Co. Power, computer 29.4 Kw 35.9 KVA 0.82 pf Power, air cond 6.5 Kw 7.34 KVA 0.88 pf Volume, computer 271 cu ft Volume, air conditioner 3,000 cu ft Area, computer 49 sq ft Area, air conditioner 250 sq ft Room size, computer 450 sq ft Room size, air conditioner 400 sq ft Floor loading 200 lbs/sq ft 1,000 lbs concen max Capacity, air conditioner 37 Tons Weight, computer 9,135 lbs Weight, air conditioner 8,500 lbs Installed in existing office building. Added a raised floor, separate air conditioning equipment with air supply from ceiling and from floor. Also separate power panel. Ford Motor Co. Volume, computer 348 cu ft Volume, air conditioner 80 cu ft Area, computer 53 sq ft Area, air conditioner 10 sq ft Room size, computer 500 sq ft Floor loading 150 lbs/sq ft 160 lbs concen max Capacity, air conditioner 7 1/2 Tons Weight, computer 8,200 lbs for the 650, 655, 533, and 407 Weight, air conditioner 600 lbs Prefabricated steel and glass partitions to enclose 500 sq- ft. area. Power lead in. Fresh air intake to implement the closed - circuit air conditioner. Water intake and outlet for air conditioner. Air conditioner is a standard York 7.5 Ton unit. Littauer Stat. Lab. Power, computer 15 Kw 17.7 KVA 0.840 pf Volume, computer 218 cu ft Area, computer 38 sq ft Room size, computer 37 ft x 17 ft Floor loading 165 lbs/sq ft 1,500 lbs concen max Capacity, air conditioner 5.25 Tons Weight, computer 6,263 lbs Weight, air conditioner 400 lbs Western Electric Co. Power, computer 71.8 Kw 90 KVA 0.8 pf Power, air cond 40 Kw 50 KVA 0.8 pf Volume, computer 12,000 cu ft Volume, air conditioner 3,000 cu ft Volume, total 15,000 cu ft Area, computer 1,500 sq ft Area, air conditioner 300 sq ft Area, total 1,800 sq ft Room size, computer 30 ft x 50 ft Room size, air conditioner k5 ft x 20 ft Room size, total 36 ft x 50 ft Floor loading 27 lbs/sq ft 100 lbs/sq ft concen max Capacity, air condition 28 1/2 Tons
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0373
Weight, computer 32,930 lbs Weight, air conditioner 5,500 lbs Raised flooring, wood and glass partitioned room, air conditioner room; constructed in a brick and steel building. Columbia Univ. Installed on existing reinforced-concrete floor. Marquette Univ. New power line distribution installed. Stanford Univ. Volume, computer 300 cu ft Volume, air conditioner 1,225 cu ft Area, computer 50 sq ft Area, air conditioner 175 sq ft Room size, computer 225 sq ft Room size, air conditioner 250 sq ft Capacity, air conditioner 40 Tons Renovate existing 70-year-old stone building; remove partitions; poured slab floor with raceways; no structural modifications. Air conditioner is shared with a Burroughs 220 and RAM. Univ. of Houston Nothing special, except power supply. (System is located in a room originally designed for a small TV studio.) Yale Univ. Power, computer 16.8 KVA Volume, computer 196 cu ft Volume, air conditioner 120 cu ft Area, computer 36 sq ft Area, air conditioner 20 sq ft Room size, computer 800 sq ft Floor loading 150 lbs/sq ft Capacity, air conditioner 20 Tons Weight, computer 5,400 lbs Weight, air conditioner 1,000 lbs PRODUCTION RECORD Manufacturer Time required for delivery 8 months COST, PRICE AND RENTAL RATES Manufacturer Basic Rent/Month Purchase Maint. Per Month (Incl Maintenance) 650 Console $2,400 $115,000 $185.00 655 Power Supply 800 42,400 34.25 533 Card Read Punch 550 25,000 52.75 Additional Equipment 652 Tape and/or File Control Unit (7 Models) $ 975-$1,950 $46,800-$93,600 $46.75-$97.50 653 Core Storage Unit (11 Models) 1,050- 2,425 57,750-133,400 28.50- 81.75 (With or w/o Index Register and Floating Point) 727 Magnetic Tape Units (6 maximum) 550 18,200 119.00 355 Disk Storage (4 maximum) - 2 models 975 62,200 194.00 1,500 74,800 306.00 838 Inquiry Station (10 maximum) 175 7,500 28.00 654 Auxiliary Alphabetic Unit (4 models) 470- 950 28,700- 57,300 23.50- 54.75 537 Card Read Punch 700 40,000 5350 407 A/C Machine with Sync.) 1,000 51,000 132.00 543 Card Reader 325 14,650 29.25 544 Card Punch 475 20,250 31.50 655 Power Supply (2 additional models) 1,100 58,300 46.00 1,400 74,200 58.00 USA ESCO Basic System The 650, 655, 543, 544, 797, 653, 652, 727 (7), 654, 774, 747, 407, and 519 rent at $16,548/month. Additional Equipment The 024, 026, 056, 066, 068, 082, 083, 077, 087, 407, 519, 523, 528, 548, and 602 rent at $8,000/month. Maintenance is included in rental. USA Richmond QM Depot Type 650 Machine No. 800 Components special devices and total approximate cost Type 650 Basic System $2,400 1 table lookup on equal at $25 ea. 25 1 basic minus circuitry at $16 ea. 16 1 set format at $70 ea. 70 1 modified branch on distributor at $9 ea. Type 533 Card Read Punch w/special devices 868 Type 652 Control Unit 1,350 Type 653 H. S. Storage Unit 1,975 Type 655 Power Unit w/Alph. Synchronizer 875 4 Type 355 Disk Storage at $975 ea. 3,900 5 Type 727 Tape Unit at $550 ea. 2,750 Total monthly rental for components and $14,238 devices Type 650 Machine No. 700 Components and special devices and total approximate cost Type 650 Basic System $2,400 1 table lookup on equals 25 1 basic minus OP code 16 1 set format 70 1 modification branch on distributor 9 Type 652 Tape Control and Power Unit 1,050 Type 653 High Speed Buffer Storage (with 1,990 RAMPC circuits) Type 655 Power Unit w/Alph. Synchronizer 875 4 Type 727 Tape Units at $550 2,200 Type 533 Card Read Punch-w/devices 868 Total monthly rental $9,503 Additional Equipment and Total Approximate Cost Type 774 Tape Data Selector w/ file search $2,500 Tape Data Selector Power, Type 747 500 Type 727 Tape Unit 550 Type 407 Accounting Machine w/devices 1,010 Doc. Orig. Machine 210 Total monthly rental $4,770
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0376
USN AF Basic System 650 Mdl. 2, 653 Mdl. C2, 727 Mdl. 1 (2), 533 Mill. 1, 652 Mdl. al, and 655 Mdl. 1 rent at $7,925/month. Additional Equipment Alpha. Device, Addn. Special Characters and Alpha. Device Synch. rent at $350/month. USN Bureau of Naval Weapons Basic System Monthly Rental 650 Magnetic Drum Processing Unit $2,486 655 Power Unit 875 533 Card Read Punch 946 652 Tape Control Unit 1,050 653 Storage Unit 2,425 654 Alphabetic Unit 690 727 Magnetic Tape Unit 550 727 Magnetic Tape Unit 550 727 Magnetic Tape Unit 550 727 Magnetic Tape Unit 550 727 Magnetic Tape Unit 550 727 Magnetic Tape Unit 550 $11,772 Additional Equipment Monthly Rental 774 Tape Data Selector $2,500 747 Tape Data Selector, Power Unit 500 407 Accounting Machine, Model B3 1,030 519 Document Originating Machine 234 727 Magnetic Tape Unit 550 4,814 USAF Hq MAAMA, Olmsted AFB Basic Add Equip Total Component Rental Cost Rental Console, Mdl 2 w/t $2,400 $100 $2,500 Control Unit for Tapes, 1,050 - 1,050 Mdl Al Stor Unit Mdl C3 1,975 - 1,975 Aux Alpha Unit, Mdl 4 950 13 963 Power Unit, Md-1 2 1,100 150 1,250 Tape Unit, Mdl 1 550 - 550 Tape Unit, Mdl 1 550 - 550 Tape Unit, Mdl 1 550 - 550 Tape Unit, Md-1 1 550 - 550 Tape Unit, Mdl 1 550 - 550 Card Read Punch 550 353 903 Card Read Punch 550 353 903 System No. 2 Total Basic Rental Cost $4,293 Rental rates for additional equipment Rental Additional Equipment Cost Aux. Synchronizer $100 Total Console Add Equip Cost $100 12 Word Smitch 13 Total Aux Alpha Add Equip 13 Alph Dev Synchronizer No. 1 75 Alph Dev Synchronizer No. 2 75 Total Power Unit Add Cost 150 Alphabetic Device 175 6 dhl punch blk col detection 48 2 grps Rd, Pch cards selectors 20 2 grps 5-2 Pos Pilot selectors 20 Half-time emmitter Rd & Pch Feed 10 2 grp 4-5 Pos Co-selectors 10 Special Char 11 & 12 only 25 Aux. Alpha Modification 45 Total Card Rd Pch Add Equip Cost 353 6 grps double pch blank col detec- 48 tion 2 grps 5-2 Pos Pilot selectors 20 2 grps 4-5 Pos Co-selectors 10 Half-time emmitters, Rd & Pch Field 10 2 gyps Rd and Pch Selectors 20 Alphabetic Device 175 Aux. Alpha Modification 45 Special Char 11 & 12 only 25 Total Card Rd, Pch Add Equip Cost 353 USAF San Bernardino AMA Monthly Rental Type Description Prime Shift 650 Central Processing Unit $2,400 655 Power Unit 990 533 Input Output Unit 88 ,273 USAF Hq SAC The system consists of: 650 Console Model 2 652 Control Unit Model C1 653 Storage Unit Model C3 654 Aux. Alpha Unit Model 2 655 Power Unit Model 1 727 Mag. Tape Unit Model 1 747 Tape Data Selector Power 774 Tape Data Selector The monthly rental is $17,293. American Airlines The computer, card read-punch, and power unit rent at $4,000.10/month. Bridgeport Brass Co. Basic System Cost Monthly Rental 650 Model 2 Console $150,000 $2,400 533 Read-Punch 25,000 780 655 Power Unit 42 400 Total $217 $ ,055 Additional Equipment 652 Model Al Control Unit $50,400 $1,050 727 Model 1 Magnetic Tape 18,200 550 Tennessee Eastman Co. Basic System The 650 Console Unit, 655 Power Unit, 533 Card Read- Punch sells for $217,400 and rents at $4,600/month. Additional Equipment The 653 Storage Unit, immediate access storage, automatic floating point, index accumulators and mode switch, 533-655 Alpha Device, extra selectors and special features cost $154,900 and rents at $2,944 per month. Maintenance is included in rental contract - approximately $536/month. Ford Motor Co. The IBM 650, 533, 407, and 655 rents at $5,800/month. Littauer Stat. Lab The IBM 650 rents at $1,662/month. All other machines from key punch to tabulator rent at $528/month. RCA Service Co., BMEWS Project Model Description Monthly Charge 650 Console $2,400 655 Power Unit 800 14 Synchronizer 75 E91844 Min. works 11 & 12, 7 & 8 115 533 Read Punch Unit 550 13 Alpha Feature 175 300 DPBC Detection (6) 48 705 Co-Selectors (2) 10 729 Read and Punch Code Selectors (2) 20 323 Emitter (Read Feed) 5 776 Spec. Char. Feature 25 E91844 Input 30 407 Accounting Machine 920 54 Automatic Control (2) 10 899 Zero & Spec. Char. Control (4) 4o 514 Reproducing Punch 125 328 Punch Emitter 3 201 Class Selectors (2) 8 551 M/S Punch Feed 50 807 Collator 245 RPQ88506 75 83 Sorter 110
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0377
26 Alpha Sorting 15 65 Card Counter 7 774 Sort Suppression 2 557 Alpha Interpreter 165 628 Proof Device 30 606 Print Entry Control 5 325 Emitter 3 780 Spec. Char. Printing 10 6,09 Western Electric Co. The 650 (1) - $2,400; 655 (1) - $1,250; 533 (1) $833; and 407 (1) - $1,240 are rented. The 653 (1) - $1,975; 355 (1) - $975; 774 (1) - $2,400; 519 (1) - $258; 407 (1) - $1,023; 727 (6) - $3,300; 652 (1) - $1,350; 747 (1) - $500; and 727 (1) - $550; are rented. Columbia Univ. The 650, 533, 655, Floating Point, Indexing, Alphabetic, and Special Character rent at $67,200/year, total. The 407, 026, 026, 080, 077, 519 rent at a total of $14,500/year. Marquette Univ. The IBM 650, 533 2 keypunches, reproducer, and printer rent at $1,850/month. Stanford Univ. The 650, 655, and 533 rent at $2,400 + 875 + 780 per month less 60%o educational contribution. The 402 rents at $430 per month, less 60%0 educational contribution. Maintenance is included in rental. Univ. of Houston IBM 650 with alphabetic and special characters, 026 collator, 407 reproducer. Yale Univ. 4 keypunches (026), 1 reproducer (519), 1 tabulator (407), 1 collator (087), 1 interpreter (557), 1 sorter (082), and 1 statistical sorter cost $39,000 (including 60% discount). The 650 drum unit, power unit, read punch unit rents at $4,000/month (less 60%o educational discount). $938/month less discount for special character device, additional selectors, half time read emitter, digit set punch feed, additional double punch detection units. Maintenance included in rental. PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS Manufacturer Complete programming and advanced programming training available as well as individual installation assistance. USA ESCO 1st 8-Hour 2nd 8-Hour 3rd 8-Hour Shift Shift Shift Supr & Adm 16 2 1 Analysts 5 Programmers 32 Clerks & Sec. 13 3 2 Librarians 1 Operators 21 19 10 Engineers IBM In-Output Oper 2 2 2 Operation tends toward open shop. Methods of training includes IBM schools and onthe-job training. USN AF One 8-Hour Shift Used Recommended Supervisors 1 1 Analysts 7 7 Programmers 2 2 Operators 1 1 Operation tends toward closed shop. Methods of training used includes manufacturer's training classes, on- the-job training, and special "on station" classes for symbolic coding. USAF San Bernardino AMA SBAMA EDP personnel requirements support the logistical mission. Additional personnel support the PCAM effort. PCAM is utilized in an integrated data processing system to provide extra off-line capability. Coders are included in the programmer category. Because of the varying quantitative effect and diverse character of the workload in the AMC logistical support, an inflexible recommendation of personnel was not attempted. Cross-trained personnel qualified to employ techniques in various computer configurations provide system flexibility. Engineers and technicians to service and maintain the EDP equipment are provided on a contractual basis by the manufacturer concerned. Extra shift time for analysts, programmers and clerks is not on a regularly scheduled basis. Whenever the workload demands, personnel hours are specially scheduled. System analysis, development and programming staff operate on one 8-hour daily shift, 5 days per week. Computer operations staff work on three 8-hour daily shifts, 7 days weekly. Supervision is included under Burroughs 220 Computer System operations staff. Operation tends toward closed shop. Methods of training used includes formal training by manufacturer and on- the-job training. USAF Hq SAC Three 8-Hour Shifts Used Recommended Supervisors 2 2 Analysts, Programmers & Coders 11 10 Clerks - 1 Librarians - 2 Operators 5 10 Engineers 2 3 Operation tends toward closed shop. Methods of training used includes manufacturer's instruction classes, on-the-job training, and inter- nally conducted instruction classes. U. S. Dept. of Interior One 8-Hour Shift Supervisors 1 Analysts 5 Operators 1 Engineers IBM Operation tends toward combination open and closed shop. Some engineers in design branches write their own programs with assistance from the Engineering Applications Section of the Automatic Data Processing Branch. The Engineering Applications Section also prepares programs and makes production calculations on a closed shop basis for many design and project offices. Design engineers of some years experience in the Denver office are detailed to the Engineering Applications Section for 90 days to learn computer capabilities, problem formulation, and programming and coding techniques. Younger engineers spend 90 days in the Section on Rotation Schedules. Filed personnel are detailed to the Section to learn requirements for the preparation of field data as well as basic computer techniques. American Airlines One 8-Hour Shift Programmers 1 Operators 1 Operation tends toward open shop. Methods of training used are on-the-job training supplemented by classroom, and instruction provided by the vendor. Bridgeport Brass Co. One 8-Hour Shift Used Recommended Supervisors 2 2 Analysts 3 3 Programmers 2 2 Clerks 2 2 Operators 1 1 Operation tends toward open shop. Methods of training used includes on-the-job, equipment manufacturer's schools, and college courses. Tennessee Eastman Co. One combined EAM and computer operations supervisor, one machine methods supervisor, one applied mathematics supervisor. It is hoped that translators will be developed to the state that coders will not be required. The clerk controls data and schedules use. Three operators trained so we can operate 24 hours per day if necessary. Service is supplied by manufacturer. We operate and pay rental based on 176 hours per month as one shift rather than the standard 8 hours per day shift. We do not feel that the present size of our staff is ideal for us or anyone else. It would not be practical to obtain as large a staff as would be needed to study all problems simultaneously. One 8-Hour Shift Supervisors 3 Analysts 4 Programmers 4 Coders 2 Clerks 1 Operators 3 Operation tends toward closed shop. Methods of training used includes manufacturer training courses and on-the-job training. Littauer Stat. Lab Two 8-Hour Shifts Used Recommended Supervisors 2 2 Analysts 3 5 Programmers 10 8 Clerks 2 2 Librarians 1 1 Operators 2 2 In-Output Oper 1 - Operation tends toward open shop. Methods of training used includes on-the-job training along with some introductory SOAP and FORTRAN classes at IBM. Western Electric Co. One 8-Hour Shift Used Recommended Supervisors 1 1 Programmers 4 4 Clerks 1 1 Librarians 1 1 In-Output Oper 2 2 Methods of training used include IBM 650 class, systems analysis, industrial engineering, and work simplification. Columbia Univ. Two 8-Hour Shifts Used Recommended Supervisors 1 Programmers 5 6 Operators 1 Operation tends toward open shop. Methods of training used includes IBM sponsored classes and practical experience. Marquette Univ. One 8-Hour Shift Used Recommended Supervisors 1 1 Analysts 1 1 Operation tends toward open shop. Univ. of Houston One 8-Hour Shift Supervisors 1 Analysts 1.5 Programmers 1 Clerks 2 Operators 1 Operation tends toward open shop. Yale Univ. One 8-Hour Shift Used Recommended Supervisors 1 - Analysts - 1 Programmers 3 2 Coders - 3 Clerks (student aides) 3 3 Librarians 0 1 Operators 0 1 Engineers Supplied by IBM Methods of training used includes classroom instruction by manufacturer, classroom instruction by staff of University, and occasional individual instruction. RELIABILITY, OPERATING EXPERIENCE, AND TIME AVAILABILITY USA ESCO Average error-free running period 40 Hours Good time 440.7 Hours /Mo. (Average) Attempted to run time 454.3 Hours/Mo. (Average) Operating ratio (Good/Attempted to run time) 0.97 Above figures based on period from Oct 59 to May 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test Jul 57 Time is not available for rent to outside organiza- tions. USN AF Good time 33.5 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 34.3 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio (Good/Attempted to run time) 0.977 Above figures based on period 1 Feb 60 to 31 Mar 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test 1 Jan 58 Time is available to other government agencies and their contractors. USN Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Good time 77 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 81 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio (Good/Attempted to run time) 0.95 Above figures based on period 1 Apr 60 to 30 Jun 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test Apr 56 Time is not available for rent to outside organiza- tions. Average running period in which no machine failures are experienced is 38 hours. There has been no experience where the computer has produced erroneous data that has not been detected through machine check points. Scheduled preventive maintenance by the manufacturer's customer engineer amounts to 6 hours
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0379
weekly. The attempted to run time indicated above does not include test and debug time. USAF SB AMA Passed Customer Acceptance Test 1 Apr 60 Time is not available for rent to outside organizations. USAF Hq AFSWC, Kirtland AFB Good time 36 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 40 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 0.90 Above figures based on period 1 Jan 60 to 1 May 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test 1 Dec 55 Time is not available for rent to outside organiza- tions. USAF Hq SAC Average error-free running period 100 Hours Good time 134 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 138 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 0.97 Above figures based on period 1 Jan 60 to 31 Mar 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test 23 Dec 58 Time is not available for rent to outside organiza- tions. Equipment is regularly scheduled 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. U. S. Dept. of Interior Average error-free running period 81.0 Hours Good time 37.4 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 38.7 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 0.968 Above figures based on period 1 Jan 60 to 30 Jun 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test 8 Dec 59 Time is available for rent to qualified outside or- ganizations. Scheduled preventive maintenance: 3 hours per week Unscheduled down time: 1.25 hrs/week for period 1 Jan 60 thru 30 Jun 60 0.35 hrs/week fpr period 1 Mar 60 thru 30 Jun 60 American Airlines Good time 33 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 0.989 Above figures based on period from Jan 59 to Mar 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test Jan 59 Time is not available for rent to outside organiza- tions. Bridgeport Brass Co. Good time 35 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 35 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 1.0 Above figures based on period 1 Jan 59 to 1 Jan 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test Oct 58 Time is available for rent to outside organizations. Tennessee Eastman Co. Average error-free running period 104 Hours Good time 49.5 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 50 Hours/Week (Average) Above figures based on period from Aug 58 to Mar 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test Jun 58 Time is available for rent to qualified outside or- ganizations. Operating ratio - 0.99 With six exceptions, all machine failures have been in the 533 card read and punch unit. The computer has made only one error which it failed to detect. Ford Motor Co. Average error-free running period Two Weeks Good time 40 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 41 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 0.975 Above figures based on period 1 May 60 to 31 May 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test 1 Aug 59 Time is not available for rent to outside organiza- tions. Littauer Stat. Lab. Average error-free running period One Month Good time 40 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 40.5 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 0.99 Above figures based on period 1 Feb 60 to 29 Feb 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test 1957 Time is not available for rent to outside organiza- tions. Western Electric Co. Good time 37 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 40 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 0.925 Above figures based on period 16 May 60 to 17 Aug 60 Passed Customer Acceptance Test Aug 59' Time is not available for rent to outside organiza- tions. Columbia Univ. Average error-free running period Intermittent - as long as a week Good time 60 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 75 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 0.80 Above figures based on recent period Passed Customer Acceptance Test Jul 58 Time is not available for rent to outside organiza tions. Marquette Univ. Good time 39 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 40 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 0.98 Passed Customer Acceptance Test Aug 58 Time is available for rent to qualified outside or- ganizations. Stanford Univ. Time is not available for rent to outside organizations. Usage of this system is erratic, since it is largely by students whose demands tend to peak at ends of quarters. Univ. of Houston Good time 48 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 56 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 0.857 Above figures based on period from 56 to 60 Time is available for rent to outside organizations. Yale Univ. Good time 95 Hours/Week (Average) Attempted to run time 100 Hours/Week (Average) Operating ratio 0.95 Above figures based on period from Jul 57 to Aug 60 Time is available for rent to educational institutions only. ADDITIONAL FEATURES AND REMARKS Manufacturer Outstanding reliability and performance. Large amount of customer experience and interchange of programming approaches and techniques. USA ED, Omaha Outstanding features are the machine is extremely reliable, card drive is well suited for solution of engineering problems, easy to program, debug and operate, and is well suited for scientific computations. Several new machines have been announced which appear to offer equal speed and reliability with the IBM 650 at a lower cost. These machines are being analyzed in an effort to provide this office with the best machinery, compatible with our workload, at the lowest possible cost.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0380
USA ER & DL Outstanding features include self checking features of IBM 650 makes results more reliable and card system facilities program debugging and development changes. USA EWES Outstanding features include internal validity checking of all data and instructions, ease of programming, and availability of large program library. Unique system advantages include input/output by punched cards allows maximum flexibility in data and programming. USA CE USAED, North Pacific Outstanding features are system is very dependable and relatively easy to program. USA ESCO Adopted procedures for magnetic tape labelling, storage, shipping, and protection from humidity, temperature and physical, electrical, fire, or other damage include the use of press-on labels. The reels are placed in plastic containers. The plastic containers are kept in metal files. Shipping is in plastic cases within 35 mm film metal containers within boxes. Tapes are stored in the air conditioned computer room. USA Ord Frankford Arsenal Outstanding features include random access ability to do a great deal of in- line processing while updating inventory records on a daily basis and ability to provide substitute items in one pass by use of chaining all substitutes in Ramac with the preferred items. Unique system advantages .include ease of file maintenance by utilizing the federal SIN only once throughout the 4 Ramac units. The key to additional trailer records is the 5 digit Ramac address. No tape sorting is used by utilizing Ramac to the utmost advantage. Contents of Ramac is dumped on magnetic tape weekly and stored in another location in the arsenal. Inventory and other records are exchanged at an alternate~site on a monthly basis. USA Ord Feltman Res. & Eng. Labs. Outstanding features are alphabetic - special character device (useful in symbolic and automatic programming), automatic floating decimal arithmetic and index registers. USA Ord Anniston Ord Depot Unique system advantage is random access to stored data. The procedures established by the manufacturer for magnetic tape labelling, storage, shipping, and protection from humidity, temperature and physical, electrical, fire, or other damage are followed by this depot. USA Richmond QM Depot The labelling of magnetic tapes is a permanent reel number and they are filed in numerical sequence. The tape librarian collaborates with supervisors and establishes a temporary title for the tape. A file of cards is maintained by reel number and they are arranged in numerical sequence within tapes in use, tapes in reserve, permanent tapes and available tapes. The tapes in use are also filed in numerical sequence within the date they will again be available. This enables the librarian to take a daily inventory of tapes available, and tapes to be available. The librarian checks all returned tapes for damage or report of faulty operation. The tapes are stored in metal filing cabinets and the room which contains them satisfies the temperature and humidity control set up by the tape manufacturers. No smoking is allowed while handling the tapes as a fire precaution. For a 650 System with magnetic tape and/or disk storage, a suitable area for use by the customer engineers, maintaining the installation, should be provided by the customer. Minimum 50 sq. ft. 10 ft x 5 ft. A Pass and Seymour No. 7250 receptacle (or equivalent should be installed for powering the tape drive tester. USN Air Dev. Cen. Outstanding features include Ramac, tapes, alphabetic, floating point, index registers, and scientific applications. USN Avionics Facility For the storage of magnetic tape, the humidity is regulated between 20,0 and 80%. The temperature is held between 700 and 800F. Tapes are protected by dust covers. USN Bureau of Naval Weapons Reels and cans are labeled by job number. Tape library is in separate air conditioned room and consists of tape racks and shelves. USN Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Consider the accuracy of the computer as outstanding and no serious delay due to downtime has been experienced during a period exceeding four years. USAF Mobile AMA Outstanding feature is range of hardware from small to large scale permits automatic data processing of workloads of varying scope, complexity, and sophistication. Unique system advantage: Standardization of equipment configurations within the Air Materiel Command, USAF, provides for processing of centrally designed and programmed systems, command wide. Tape procedures: Tape storage is accomplished in secure storage vault with the same temperature and humidity controls required for the ADPE. Personnel traffic control is emphasized in machine processing and tape storage areas. Each tape reel is permanently labelled with a tape serial number when it enters the tape inventory. In addition to a label on the magnetic tape itself, each reel is labelled to identify information on magnetic tape. Perpetual inventory and tape history, including incidence of error conditions, is maintained for each reel of magnetic tape. Fire hazards and electrical interference are strictly controlled in the machine processing and tape storage area. Standard cardboard tape shipping containers have been used with minor incidence of breakage to plastic reel containers, and negligible tape or tape reel damage or distortion of data. USAF APGC (PGCS), Eglin AFB Unique system advantages are accuracy, moderate cost, sub-routine availability, central air conditioning system. System has two additional alpha words. USAF Hq Europe Outstanding features are equipment very reliable and high level of production is maintained. Tapes have both physical external label and internal tape header and trailer records. Programs automatically check internal labels. Tapes stored in fire proofed air conditioned vault and shipped in manufacturers' containers. EDPS is used on varied applications ranging from business type record keeping to psuedo-scientific computations. EDPS functions as part of headquarters data processing center equipped with conventional punched card equipment (PCAM), auditing staffs & etc.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0381
USAF Hq MATS, Scott AFB Tapes are identified with a label which indicates program which generated the tape, as of date, tape number, and number of tapes in the series. All tapes are stored in a fireproof vault. The humidity and temperature are controlled by the central air conditioner. USAF Hq SAC The outstanding feature is the random access, large capacity storage. Entire tape library is located within the computer room. Shipping tapes is generally by mail - packaged in original plastic envelope and carton. Tapes are labelled by machine recording and affixing a standard format adhesive label to the exterior of the reel. USAF 2709th AF Vehicle Control Gp. An outstanding feature is the alphabetic device. Unique system advantages include speed, reliability, efficient storage, ability to re-code, and word size emitter. Tape storage is under a water sprinkling system and enclosed in an air conditioned room. U. S. Dept. of Interior System used is basic IBM 650 with alphabetic device, half-time emitter on read feed, additional pilot selectors, co-selectors, read and punch code selectors, and double punch and blank column detection. Additional equipment was added to permit use of SOAP, SIR, and FORTRANSIT. US Treasury Dept., Internal Revenue Service Outstanding features (as compared to previous equipment (IBM Type 604s)) include stored programs, one computer instead of a battery of computers, and variable, rather than fixed, speed. Unique system advantages include a wider range of applications is now feasible and experience has been gained in the use of stored-program equipment. Bell Telephone Labs., Inc. An outstanding feature is accuracy and speed. Bridgeport Brass Co. Duplicate program decks and procedures stored in separate, distant area. Chase Manhattan Bank Outstanding feature is that the system is completely self-checking. A unique system advantage is the availability of tape driven tabulator known as tape data selector. Air conditioning and humidity controls are employed. Records required for reconstruction of magnetic tape data stored at Records Center at Granite Springs, New York. Combustion Engineering, Inc. Outstanding feature include three index accumulations; six tape units, and floating decimal operation. Adopted procedures for magnetic tape labelling, storage, shipping, and protection from humidity, temperature and physical, electrical, fire, or other damage are monitored by tape librarian, who is responsible for maintaining, storing, and shipping tapes. The Computer Center was designed with the above described hazards in mind. Educational Testing Service An outstanding feature is the reliability of systemminimum of down time with limited amount of scheduled preventive maintenance time. Emerson Electric Mfg. Co. Paper inserted into slots on the reel and gummed tape are used for visual identification of magnetic tape reels. Magnetic labels are inserted in tape files at the beginning of a reel for computer program identification of the reel. Cleveland Engine Plants, FOMOCO An outstanding feature is that computer includes alphabetic devices. Lincoln-Mercury Div., FOMOCO A unique system advantage is more and better data at less processing cost. Tractor & Implement Div., FOMOCO Tapes are stored in fire- resistant safe located in computer room, which is temperature and humidity controlled. Adv. Prod. Study & Engrg. Res. Office, FOMOCO Equipment used with this system also includes a punched-card to curve point plotter (Benson-Lehner) and a B-L Model "K" OSCAR, Oscillogram-to- Punched Card Data Transcription Device. In addition to the IBM 650 Digital Computer, this activity also operates a 120-amplifier analog computer installation, using equipment manufactured by Electronic Associates and Goodyear Aircraft Corporation. This equipment is used primarily for solution of problems in vibration, vehicle stability and servo system design. A. C. Spark Plug Div., General Motors Corp. Outstanding features include automatic floating decimal device, index registers, and core storage. Tape records are kept on IBM cards and a report submitted weekly on tapes stored. Tapes are stored in air conditioned room in metal cabinets. No need to ship tapes. Littauer Stat. Lab. Outstanding features are low rates for university research, immediate machine scheduling, and small staff and personalized service. Metropolitan Life Ins. Co. A unique system advantage is the in- line method of processing reduces processing time. Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. Outstanding features are better than 900 utilization, 100% use of storage on most work gives strong competitive position, no control board changes; all programs written by computer center; they use one board, index accumulators, and floating decimal point hardware, enabling more rapid programming and computing of scientific problems. Republic Aviation Corp. Outstanding features are read punch, floating point arithmetic, index registers, and auxiliary core storage. Socony Mobil Oil Co., Inc., New York Outstanding features are floating point arithmetic and 700 series compatibility. All tapes are stored in computer room. No special precautions taken in relation to protection from humidity, temperature and physical, electrical, fire, or other damage. Standard Oil Co. of California A unique system advantage is its self- checking capability. New York Stock Exchange A unique system advantage is reduction of card handling to a minimum. United Gas Corp. An outstanding feature is accuracy through validity check points. Western Electric Co. Adopted procedures for magnetic tape labelling, storage, shipping, and protection from humidity, temperature and physical, electrical, fire, or other damage, include tape librarian, system for purging tapes, open files in library room, and temperature and humidity control.
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0382
Western Electric Co., Allentown Works Outstanding features are dual card read feeds (through IBM 533 and IBM 407 Units) and elimination of the need to collate master and detail card decks. Western Electric Co., Indianapolis An outstanding feature is index registers, which allow address modifications thereby reducing program size and programming effort. Random access plus building block feature to provide for flexibility for required memory capacity. Labelling - tape reels are externally labeled; in addition a tape mark is written containing the purge date. Storage - Current tapes are stored in the computer room in wright-line tape cabinets. Protection - Previous generation tapes are placed in plastic bags and stored in a vault located in another area of the plant. Western Electric Co., Omaha Machine is equipped with following features: Alphabetic Device Special Character Device Group I 20 Pilot Selectors 16 Co-Selectors Digit Emitter on Read and Punch Half Time Selectors on Read and Punch Western Electric Co., Winston-Salem Outstanding feature is the on- line IBM 407 Printer. Georgia Institute of Tech., Rich ECC Outstanding feature is the large library of subroutines and simplified programming systems (i.e. B. G. P. S. Fortran). Indiana Univ. A unique system advantage is ease of programming was important in the open shop operation. Iowa State Univ. This 650 is used on an open shop basis, 24 hours a day if and when desired by the users. The users consist of all departments on the campus who have computing needs. The 650 is located in the Statistical Laboratory which in turn consults, teaches and uses the 650 in the normal course of its daily activities. Johns Hopkins Univ. An outstanding feature is the alphabetic attachment. Louisiana State Univ. Outstanding features are index registers and automatic floating point device. Oklahoma State Univ. Outstanding features are special characters groups 1 and 2, floating point, index registers, and core storage. Univ. of Mississippi The system is a commercially available one, with no modifications made or proposed. Univ. of Southern Cal., Aeronautic Lab. Dept. A unique system advantage is the ability to reduce test data on-line without disadvantages of direct connection of computer to instrumentation. Univ. of Wisconsin General-purpose system suited to very wide variety of problems. Tapes are kept in machine room. No special procedures or precautions. Virginia Polytechnic Institute The wide-spread use of this system provides excellent opportunities for interchange of programs. See "ILLIAC" file for 650 information. FUTURE PLANS USA ED, Omaha Projected Equipment Procurements Retain the installed IBM 650 Card-operated Electronic Computer in its present form through FY 1961. Provide a second shift computer operation when computer utilization exceeds a continuous 100%. Provide a tape drive, floating decimal' and index accumulators when the capacity of the present machine is exceeded. This should become necessary during FY 1962 or 1963. Continue to evaluate new equipment in order to provide the best and most modern equipment consistent with cost and district requirements. Projected Plans for Increasing Computer Utilization Provide top level direction of the computer operation. Encourage all district organizations to utilize the computer facilities and to provide technical assistance where needed. Teach all scientific and engineering personnel to perform computer programming. Provide a computer staff with engineering and scientific technical ability. Continue the training of computer specialist in order to provide an adequate staff. USA Eng. Res. & Dev. Lab. A digital plotter has been added. This is a high resolution point and line plotter for up to 30 x 30 inches, symbols, or continuous photo. USAF. Waterways Exp. Sta. Consideration is being given to the addition of automatic floating point arithmetic and index registers as extra features to the present machine in order to provide capability sufficient to meet present and foreseeable needs. USA CE, USA ED, North Pacific Our complex reservoir system planning and operational analyses requirements indicate a larger system is necessary for comprehensive analyses wherein optimization of reservoir regulation on a system basis can be accomplished. Currently the restrictions on memory capacity and computing speed limit the amount of work which can be accomplished in this connection. This need, together with our increasing computer work load on other engineering studies and possible extension of the work into the comptroller field, has led to the investigation of possibilities of extending the present system and of utilizing a larger scale computer system. It appears feasible in the future to extend our present 650 system to include a 653 Immediate Access Storage which includes 60 additional words of high speed memory, floating point (decimal locating) accumulators, and indexing registers or replace the 650 system with one of approximate or greater capabilities of the expanded system at possibly lesser cost. This would give us an effective increase of speed and memory which would assist in meeting our foreseeable immediate requirements. An IBM 407 Accounting Machine, which is on an average 50 cards per minute faster then the installed 402, would facilitate listing, tabulating and summarizing data. There is some evidence that a system other than the 650 system with on line printing capabilities may better serve the requirements of this Division.
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USA ESCO Proposed systems changes are currently deferred pending decision on Single Manager for Construction assignment within the Corps of Engineers which will, in some areas require larger computer systems in accordance with the volume received. However, data processing systems as produced, are constantly being investigated and evaluated. Currently, a study of the IBM 1401 Data Processing System is being performed. USA Ord Frankford Arsenal It is planned to replace 3 Model 1 Ramac Units by 2 Model 2 (Double Density Units). This will provide a needed additional 10,000 of random access storage for an additional 75.00 per month. A request is in process to replace our present tape data selector and all its components by an IBM 1401. This replacement will provide much more speed in printing reports and will enable us to use the 1401 for small projects requiring computation. It will be used for specific tape jobs now being accomplished on the 650. This replacement is practically the same rental but will provide a much more flexible ADP operation. USA Ord Feltman Res. & Eng. Labs. Installation of a large-scale digital computing system is under consideration. Present large-scale problems are run by local personnel and contractors on machines available off the Arsenal. Present applications are increasing rapidly and new applications of major proportions are anticipated. Target date for installation of an IBM 709 on a rental basis is tentatively set for January 1961. An IBM 1401 will be used for auxiliary off-line operations. The IBM 650, which is now used for the major part of two shifts on problems which can be accommodated within its speed and storage capacity, will be returned to the manufacturer upon installation of the large-scale system. USA Ord Watervliet Arsenal As soon as studies can be completed the following additional applications will be placed on the computer: Supply inventories, personnel statistics, nationwide gage inventory, planning and estimating, material control, appropriation accounting, general accounting, tooling inventory, machine loading and scheduling, and preventive maintenance program. USA Ord Anniston Ord Depot It is anticipated that an IBM 1401 Data Processing System will be acquired to replace the present tape data selector system. At present there are studies being made of some 13 areas of data processing for possible mechanization. USA Richmond QM Depot Future plans are now being taken into consideration by a planning group composed of programmers and analysts. Future plans call for the integration of the IBM 7070. This will be augmented by the 1401. This will most likely modify our present system by replacing the one 650 system (with disk storage). Work volume under the new single manager will eventually determine our proposed systems. USA Signal Corps School Installation of militarized computer to be used for educational purposes. Expansion of computer laboratory and facilities (proposal). USN Service Center Analysis is now in progress to replace the IBM 650 with either an IBM 1401 or RCA 301 Card System. Both systems have the capacity for expansion and installation of either would result in an overall savings to Navy. Those savings would be both tangible and intangible. USN Air Development Center Research and development program on ACL Digital Data Center which gives added capability to data handling capabilities. USN Bureau of Naval Weapons This system is due to be removed soon, to be replaced with a later model system. USN New York Naval Shipyard This activity has recently recommended the acquisition of an intermediate size tape computer. Proposed applications, i.e., payroll, supply, cost, scheduling, are more readily adaptable to tape systems as against EAM card systems. The computer considered to meet this shipyard requirement is the National Cash Register NCR 304 Machine. USN Portsmouth Naval Shipyard A study is under way regarding replacement of the IBM Type 533 Card Read Punch Unit by an IBM Type 543 Card Reader and an IBM Type 544 Card Punch to increase computer availability time through these faster input-output units. Indications at this time point to such action. Plans are under way to develop an integrated data processing system for the shipyard and when finally developed, and if approved, will require a larger scale computer system. USN Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Design of integrated system (procedures) currently being performed in connection with proposed installation of an IBM 7070 Data Processing (magnetic tape) System. USN Supply Center, Oakland NSC, Oakland is presently analyzing and programming for Philco 2000 Computer. This equipment is slated for delivery. The equipment on order includes the following components: Quantity 1 Model 210 Arithmetic & Control Unit, Console and Typewriter, including 8 index registers. 1 Model 2204 Magnetic Core Storage Unit (4096 words) 11 Model 234 Magnetic Tape Units, 2 units, on line/off line 1 Model 235 Input-Output Processor (16x1) 1 Model 256 Printer System (900 1pm), on line off line 1 Model 258 Punched Card Reader (2000 lpmm), on line/off line 1 Model 259 Punched Card Control Unit 1 Model 260 Card Punch (100 lpm), on line/off line 2 Model 280 Universal Buffer Control Units Initial applications for the 2000 will be inventory control for 670,000 stock items, both quantitatively and financially; requisition status for all inputs; civilian payrolls; labor distribution; and employees savings bond accounting. USAF Hq MAAMA, Olmsted AFB Implementation of a mechanized payroll system providing for preparation of civilian payroll checks, bond issuance program, and leave and earning statement is scheduled for December 1960. USAF Mobile AMA Applications: Expansion, integration, and sophistication of current systems will saturate computer capabilities for the immediate future. Equipment: Transistorized equipment is on order (IBM Type 1401) to replace currently installed auxiliary equipment for card to tape, tape to card, printing, and data selection functions. The use of this equipment for edit
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and sort operations, simple main frame runs, and possible PCAM applications is being explored. Long range plans include the acquisition of large scale, solid state data processing equipment. USAF San Bernardino AMA Future developments involving EDPE in AMC activities are generated at Hq AMC, Wright-Patterson AF Base, Dayton, Ohio. USAF Hq AFSWC, Kirtland AFB A change of systems is anticipated during FY 62. Determination of system to be utilized has not been made at this time. USAF APGC (PGCS), Eglin AFB 543 Card Reader and 544 Card Punch scheduled to replace 533. USAF Hq, Europe An increase in utilization is anticipated due to an expansion of a present data analysis application. Future plans indicate a requirement for larger capacity equipment within two years. USAF Hq MATS Because of the increasing demands of the MATS staff for more and varied statistical information necessary for proper management, this installation is planning on a transition to a "second generation" computer during 1961. The application in which the greatest expansion is expected to occur is the field of operation and traffic. USAF Hq, Pacific Request has been made for a larger capacity computer to permit advancement in electronic data processing. USAF Hq PACAF Requirements for a system with greater capacity and speed to meet demands for weather applications and other classified programs will be undertaken shortly with a projected installation date of 1 July 1961. USAF ROAMA, Griffiss AFB One 650 being retired. USAF Hq SAC The 650 Tape RAMAC System will be replaced by an NCR 304 EDP System. The primary application will remain in the personnel accounting and authorizations area. The processing will be extensively altered, however, to include "machine decisions" on most manning actions and personnel transfers throughout the command. USAF 2709th AF Vehicle Control Gp. Retirement of stock control and distribution (inventory management) application is contingent upon implementation on Type 705 EDPE. New application is to be monetary property management. California Division of Highways We are continually developing new applications, however, overall usage has leveled off. New equipment will be obtained when faster compilation and additional storage are available at approximately the same price. U. S. Dept. of Interior Additional applications will be put on computer in future as need develops and after it is known they are proper problems for the equipment. U. S. Treasury Dept., Internal Revenue Service Future plans fall into two categories: Short range: Internal Revenue will convert present processes to an IBM 7070 System at Lawrence, Mass., Kansas City, Mo., and Ogden, Utah. Each 7070 System will perform the work now done by a 650 and the sizeable battery of EAM equipment which supports it. Each 7070 System will use magnetic tape as the principal medium of computer input and output. IBM 1400 series equipment will be employed for card-to-tape conversion and printing and, in addition, each system will include Type 408 Printers. Operations on these systems will begin 1 January 1961 at Lawrence and 1 January 1962 at Kansas City and Ogden. Long range: Internal Revenue is developing plans for an automatic data processing system which will be centered around a master file of U.S. taxpayers' accounts and which will incorporate the bulk of the present returns processing and other clerical and accounting processes. The planned installations are a computer center which will maintain the master file, and peripheral service centers which will send data to, and receive data from, the computer center. The system is scheduled to begin operational tests 1 January 1962 in the computer center and one service center. Present schedules call for phased extension of the system over the period from then until 1969. American Airlines Proposed replacement by IBM 7070. Crosley Div., Avco Corp. We plan to increase our digital computing capacity during the last half of 1961. The equipment being considered are the IBM 7070 with 1401, and the Honeywell 800 with the 400. No definite decision will be made on these machines until all studies are complete. Present tentative plans call for using the equipment for such commercial applications as: production scheduling, inventory control, and personnel time allocation, as well as for all the scientific computations. Bell Telephone Labs., Inc. Planning for either an additional IBM 650 Machine or an IBM 1401 Machine. Bendix Aviation Corp., Res. Labs. Div. Will replace present systems with following system in the Fall of 1961. Bendix G20 Computer, 8K Core Memory, line printer, card input-output, and auxiliary card handling equipment. Braniff Airways, Inc. Now making study of tape system to replace present computer. New applications being considered are flight crew scheduling and utilization, and flight equipment maintenance scheduling. Bridgeport Brass Co. Possible acquisition of more powerful computer for new or expanded applications. The Chase Manhattan Bank An RCA 501 is to be installed for demand deposit accounting. A Univac Solid State 80 is to be installed for corporate trust accounting. An IBM 1401 is to be installed for payroll and employee benefits work. Combustion Engineering, Inc. We anticipate receiving a IBM 7070 to replace the 650 unit. Also, we will lease an IBM 1401. No alteration in the computer site will be necessary. With the addition of the above described units present program and systems will be converted. These units will permit us to install an effective long range scheduling system to cover the major portion of our manufacturing business. Also, a system is being developed which will indicate the state of our contracts. More comprehensive programs will be developed for equipment design, stress and thermal analysis problems. Convair-Pomona, General Dynamics We will install new card input/output equipment. The 533 will be replaced with an IBM 543 and IBM 544. This will increase input speed 250 and output speed 1500. Convair-Fort Worth High speed input-output 543 and 544 on order.
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Tennessee Eastman Co. By assigning a project team to each of our three manufacturing areas we hope to coordinate all work in each area toward a master plan using the total systems approach. A separate section, Applied Mathematics, was recently established to serve as consultants and to apply scientific techniques to equipment and process design problems, management problems, and analysis of experimental data. This group will also do research on computer and mathematical methods. We are in the process of evaluating our future computer needs. The addition of immediate access storage, index accumulators and automatic floating point will increase speed and capacity to the point we can grow for one year. Educational Testing Service Plan to install an RCA 501 Computer System to replace our IBM 650 Computer System. The RCA 501 will include: Model 503 Computer 561-2 Hi-Speed Storage 581 Tape Stations (6) 533 On-line Printer 528 Card Reader 538 Card Punch 547-6 Tape Switching Unit E1 Paso Natural Gas Co. An IBM 7070 Tape Oriented System and two 1401 Tape Systems will be delivered. Emerson Electric Mfg. Co. Studies are being made for the procurement of a more powerful computer to replace our present equipment. Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. The computer system was retired as of 30 April 1960 due to lack of work load. Tractor & Implement Div., FOMOCO New applications include production control (computation of parts requirements, production progress reporting, direct labor performance reporting, and stock status and inventory control) and sales analysis (order status reporting and sales statistics by product by customer). Ford Motor Company Intended acquisition of IBM 1401 Data Processing System. Adv. Prod. Study & Engrg. Res. Office, FOMOCO General intention to replace complete 650 installation with large-storage, high speed computer as work requirements develop. Steel Div., FOMOCO Future plans include continued programming in areas of production control, applied research, and accounting. Larger systems are being examined, probably tape, for replacement of the present card system. General Electric Co. Expect to eliminate the IBM 650 Tape Computer System and consolidate all tape applications on an IBM 7090 Computer located in another department. Will retain 650 Drum Type System and acquire an IBM 1401 Data Processing System. A. C. Spark Plug Div., General Motors Corp. Both 650 Tape Systems to be replaced by IBM 7070. A.C. Spark Plug Div., GMC Presently considering installation of IBM Type 7070 Tape System. Also two Type 1401 Systems. These will modify existing EAM area and replace 650 System now in use. Harrison Radiator Div., GMC Future plans call for retirement of present system and the acquisition of a solid state magnetic tape system. Institute for Defense Analyses The 650 System will be replaced by a Control Data Corporation 1604 Computer. A brief summary of the 1604 characteristics are stored program, general purpose; digital computer; 48-bit word length; six index registers; magnetic core storage, 32,768 48-bit words; 4.8 microseconds effective cycle time; 6.4 microseconds total cycle time; indirect addressing; and single address logic, 2 instructions per word. Kaman Aircraft Corp. In the process of doing a feasibility study for a transistorized tape-oriented system. Martin Co. Plan to discontinue 650's and install an IBM 7070 and 1401 Systems. Metropolitan Life Ins. Co. The work will probably be absorbed eventually by a large-scale system; of a type that has not yet been determined. Mutual Benefit Life Ins. Co. It is intended to install an IBM 7070 System which will eventually replace the two card 650's. Newport News Ship & Dry Dock Co. We are evaluating an IBM 1401 System. Ohio Oil Company One IBM 7070 and 2 IBM 1401 Systems are to be installed. Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. Current computer programs are exceeding storage capacity to the point where we are negotiating for a 4,000 word drum. It is recognized that this is a stop gap measure since the magnetic drum is fast becoming obsolete. We will evaluate the newer computing facilities with the intention of replacing the present IBM 650 with a more up to date computer. Prudential Ins. Co. of America Future plans are being constantly evolved and include: consideration of new computers; advantages of consolidating data processing in a central location; data and document transmission systems; information retrieval in connection with file and data storage problems; addition of functions to our major data processing systems (case work, random file reference, and increased processing frequency); and the use of IBM 1401 Data Processing Systems. RCA Service Company, BMEWS Project Expect to switch to Univac 1105. Shell Development Co. Release of this equipment is planned. Socony Mobil Oil Co., Inc. The IBM 650 will be replaced by an IBM 7090 and an IBM 1401. Standard Oil Co. of California System will be retired, with programs converted to IBM 7090 or 1401. United Gas Corp. Future plans are to install a magnetic tape oriented system. The configuration of equipment consists of the following: Machine Monthly Qty Item Number Rental 1 Console Control Unit 7150 $ 300 1 Core Storage 7301-2 7,025 1 Arith. Unit w/Float. Point 7601 4 350 1 Core Storage Control 7602-2 2,000 1 Magnetic Tape Control 7604-1 2,700 10 Magnetic Tape Units 720-4 9,000 1 Console Card Reader 7501 75 2 Processing Units Model C-3 1401 6,910 2 Card Read Punch Model 1 1402 1,100 2 Printers Model 2 1403 1,550 ------ $35,010
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This order for equipment was placed 27 January 1960 with the understanding that it may be cancelled or changed by us at any time, with no obligation on our part, to conform to our future data processing equipment requirements and with the understanding that the IBM organization will work with us on conversion and that delivery schedule of the equipment will be arranged to coincide with our requirements. Upon delivery and installation of this equipment, we will expect to release a substantial part of the equipment now in use in our Shreveport, Louisiana and Houston, Texas offices. Universal Oil Products Co. Entire system will be replaced in 1961 by a purchased IBM 7070 System with card input-output, 5,000-word core storage, floating point instructions. Western Electric Co., New York Constant study for new developments and improvement of present applications. Also study of new machine systems for potential ability to improve systems, capacity and cost. For example, we are studying substitution of 1401 and/or 7070 System for 650 Tape System. Present indications are that 1401 System will give more favorable capacity to cost relationship and improve present systems. Western Electric Co., Allentown Works Anticipated modifications include installation of new card read and punch units to obtain faster card speeds. IBM 543 and 544 units will replace IBM 533 unit. Acquisition of new systems - planning on starting feasibility study to replace existing system with newer equipment. Western Electric Co., Indianapolis An additional IBM 650 Tape-Ramac System, to be employed for mechanization of shop scheduling and process inventory control, is on order, consisting of: 1 Type 650 Console 1 Type 655 Power Unit 1 Type 652 Control Unit 1 Type 653 I. A. S. Unit 2 Type 727 Tape Units 1 Type 355 Disk Storage 1 Type 407 On-line Printer 1 Type 543 Read Unit 1 Type 541E Punch Unit The existing Type 533 Read Punch Unit is to be replaced by a Type 543 Read Unit and Type 544. Punch Unit. Western Electric Co., Omaha Proposed complete system on production control in the manufacture of telephone switching equipment, including explosion of assemblies into component parts, scheduling of production facilities taking into consideration economical quantities and reorder points, feed back to maintain control and associated accounting and managerial reports. Scientific inventory control and the latest techniques on control of production will be used to produce a completed integrated system. We are currently conducting a feasibility study to determine what size and type of a latter generation of machine will be required. Present indications point to a core storage machine with tapes in the medium size area. Probable on the air date: Early 1962. Auburn Univ. An order has been submitted for one 077 series 50 collator and one 548 interpreter. Brigham Young Univ. We now plan to purchase IBM 650 with 4,000 word drum. No other changes currently anticipated for near future. Colorado State Univ. Plan to get an IBM 650 the Simmer 1960. Columbia Univ., Elect. Res. Labs. Proposal for an expanded system includes addition to present system of: floating point capability; index registers (3 units); rapid access storage (60 words total); tape units (2 units). Facility improvement by providing a self-contained air conditioner for the computing equipment to enable stable temperature and humidity control. Cornell Univ. Since the program in which this system is a part is still growing, it will be necessary to obtain larger and faster equipment in the not too distant future. In all probability a system with magnetic tape facilities will be obtained. Florida State Univ. Acquisition of a 700 or 7000 series computer is planned for October 1961. New computing center is currently under construction and negotiations for a larger computer are in progress. Indiana Univ. It is anticipated that sometime soon after 1 July 1961 the Center will replace the 650 Tape System with an IBM 7070 System. The approximate configuration will be: 7150 Console (Model 1) 7600 Input-output Control (Model 1) 7601 Arithmetic & Program Control (Model 1) 7602 Core Storage Control (Model A2) 7603 Input-output Synchronizer (Model 4) 7301 Core Storage 10K (Model 2) 7604 Tape Control (Model 1) 7400 Printer (Model 1) 7550 Card Punch (Model 1) 2 7500 Card Readers (Model 1) 7 729 Magnetic Tape Units (Model 4) Iowa State Univ. Will add a 4,000 word drum. Johns Hopkins Univ. IBM 7090 Computer System with 1401 C3 planned for installation. Marquette Univ. Adding floating decimal, indexing registers, and special characters group. Montana State College To be acquired are a 653 unit and a 407 unit. North Carolina State College Plan to replace 650 System with Rem. Rand Univac Solid State 80 with 4 tape units. Syracuse Univ. Expanded system to be installed. Texas Engineering Experiment Station The 704 will be replaced with a 32K - 2 channel 8 tape IBM 709. Univ. of Arkansas Needless to say, we hope to add to our basic 650 installation. It is hoped that at the end of about a year of operation that we can add index registers, 60 words of core storage, and floating point arithmetic. Univ. of Georgia Plan to add 600 position core storage, 3 indexing registers, and floating decimal arithmetic device. Univ. of Kentucky Plan to obtain 101 Statistical Sorter in near future. Univ. of Rochester A larger high-speed system is needed. Several solid state systems, such as IBM 7070, are under consideration for installation within the next 12 - 18 months. This will replace present system. Univ. of Southern California Expect to replace 650 with IBM 1620 when card I/0 becomes available.
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Univ. of Wisconsin CDC 1604 and 160 Computers planned to replace 650. No major changes planned in peripheral equipment. Staff increases of around 100% planned during next two-year period. Washington State Univ. Washington State University plans to replace the present 650 with an IBM 704 System including 4K core storage, 8K magnetic drum and 4 magnetic tape drives in July 1961. Yale University A new computing center with an IBM 7070 and IBM 1401 System by 1 July 1961, with 10,000 words of core storage, floating point arithmetic, and 10 magnetic tapes, two of which are shared by the 1401. INSTALLATIONS U. S. Army Engineer District, Omaha, 1709 Jackson Street, Omaha, Nebraska U. S. Army Engineer Research and Development Laboratories, Data Processing and Statistical Services, Fort Belvoir, Virginia U. S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army Engineer Division, North Pacific, 210 Custom House, Portland 9, Oregon U. S. Army Engineer Supply Control Office, Corps of Engineers, 410 North Broadway, St. Louis 66, Missouri U. S. Army Ordnance Frankford Arsenal, Field Service Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania U. S. Army Ordnance Feltman Research and Engineering Laboratories, Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, New Jersey U. S. Army Ordnance Watervliet Arsenal, ADPS Branch, Watervliet, New York U. S. Army Anniston Ordnance Depot, Machine Accounting Services Division, Anniston, Alabama U. S. Army Philadelphia Quartermaster Depot, Military Clothing and Textile Supply Agency, 2800 South 20th Street, Philadelphia 45, Pennsylvania U. S. Army Richmond Quartermaster Depot, Richmond, Virginia U. S. Army Signal Corps School, Automatic Data Processing Section, Fort Monmouth, New Jersey U. S. Navy Service Center, Washington 25, D. C. U. S. Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, Pennsylvania U. S. Naval Avionics Facility, Indianapolis, Indiana U. S. Navy Department, Bureau of Naval Weapons, 18th & Constitution Ave., N. W., Washington 25, D.C. New York Naval Shipyard, Brooklyn 1, New York Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Comptroller Department, Portsmouth, New Hampshire Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington U. S. Naval Supply Center, Oakland, Oakland 14, California U. S. Air Force, Headquarters OCAMA, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma U. S. Air Force, Headquarters MAAMA, Comptroller, Olmsted Air Force Base, Pennsylvania U. S. Air Force, Mobile Air Materiel Area, Office of Comptroller, Brookley Air Force Base, Alabama U. S. Air Force, San Bernardino Air Materiel Area, Norton Air Force Base, California U. S. Air Force, AFSWC, Statistical Services Division, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico U. S. Air Force, APGC (PGCS), Directorate of Statistical Services, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida U. S. Air Force, Headquarters Europe, Directorate of Statistical Services, APO 633, New York, N. Y. U. S. Air Force, Headquarters, Military Air Transport Service, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois U. S. Air Force, Headquarters Pacific, Statistical Services, APO 953, San Francisco, California U. S. Air Force, Headquarters Pacific, A-3 Directorate of Control, APO 953, San Francisco, California U. S. Air Force, ROAMA, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York U. S. Air Force, Headquarters Strategic Air Command, Statistical Services Division, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska U. S. Air Force, 2709th AF Vehicle Control Group, 3300 Jackson Avenue, Memphis 2, Tennessee N.A.S.A. Flight Research Center, box 273, Edwards, California U. S. Department of Agriculture, Commodity Stabilization Service, Evanston, Illinois California Division of Highways, 1120 "N" Street, Sacramento, California U. S. Department of Commerce, Coast and Geodetic Survey, Washington 25, D. C. U. S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado U. S. Treasury Department, Internal Revenue Service, Collection Division, 10th & Constitution Avenues, Washington, D. C. American Airlines, 100 Park Avenue, New York, New York Advanced Technology Laboratory, American Standard, Mountain View, California Crosley Division of Avco Corporation, 1329 Arlington Street, Cincinnati 29, Ohio Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, Ohio Bell Telephone Laboratories, Incorporated, 3300 Lexington Road, S.E., Winston-Salem, North Carolina Bell Telephone Laboratories, Incorporated, Allentown Laboratory, 555 Union Boulevard, Allentown, Pennsylvania Bell Telephone Laboratories, Incorporated, 463 West Street, New York 14, New York Bell Telephone Laboratories, Incorporated, Murray Hill, New Jersey Bendix Aviation Corporation, Research Laboratories Division, P. 0. Box 5115, Detroit 35, Michigan Braniff Airways, Incorporated, Exchange Park, Dallas, Texas Bridgeport Brass Company, 30 Grand Street, Bridgeport 2, Connecticut The Chase Manhattan Bank, 57 William Street, Room 200, New York, N.Y. The Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Company of Maryland, 5711 York Road, Baltimore 12, Maryland Clark Brothers Company, Division of Dresser Operations, Incorporated, Olean, New York Combustion Engineering, Incorporated, 200 Madison Avenue, New York 16, New York Convair, Division of General Dynamics, Pomona, California Convair, Division of General Dynamics, Fort Worth, Texas Douglas Aircraft Company, Department B7-250, El Segundo, California Dow Chemical Company, Texas Division, B-2402, Plant B, Freeport, Texas Tennessee Eastman Company, Division of Eastman Kodak Company, Kingsport, Tennessee Educational Testing Service, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey E1 Paso Natural Gas Company, Administrative Services Department, P. 0. Box 1492, E1 Paso, Texas
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0388
The Emerson Electric Manufacturing Company, 1567 Salzman Avenue, Wellston, Missouri The Firestone Tire & Rubber Company, Guided Missile Division, 2525 Firestone Boulevard, Los Angeles 54, California Cleveland Engine Plants, Cleveland Computer Center, FOMOCO, P. 0. Box 191, Berea, Ohio Ford Motor Company, Lincoln-Mercury Division, 3000 Schaefer Road, Dearborn, Michigan Ford Motor Company, Tractor & Implement Division, 2500 E. Maple Road, Birmingham, Michigan Ford Motor Company, Dearborn Stamping Plant, Controller's Office, Box 494, Dearborn, Michigan Ford Motor Company, Advanced Product Study & Engineering Research Office, 20000 Rotunda Drive, Dearborn, Michigan Ford Motor Company, Steel Division, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, Michigan General Electric Company, Large Jet Engine Department, Building 800, Evendale 15, Ohio A. C. Spark Plug Division, General Motors Corporation, 7929 S. Howell Avenue, Milwaukee 1, Wisconsin A. C. Spark Plug Division, General Motors Corporation, 1300 N. Dort Highway, Flint, Michigan Harrison Radiator Division, General Motors Corporation, Lockport, New York Institute for Defense Analyses, Weapons Systems Evaluation Division, Room 1E871, The Pentagon, Washington 25, D. C. The Kaman Aircraft Corporation, Old Windsor Road, Bloomfield, Connecticut Littauer Statistical Laboratory, 94 Prescott Street, Cambridge 38, Massachusetts The Martin Company, Baltimore 3, Maryland Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, 1 Madison Avenue, New York 10, N. Y. Michigan Bell Telephone Company, 23500 Northwestern Highway, Southfield, Michigan Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company, 520 Broad Street, Newark 1, New Jersey Newport News Ship & Dry Dock Company, Tabulating Department, Washington Avenue, Newport News, Virginia The Ohio 011 Company, 539 South Main Street, Findlay, Ohio Olin Matbieson Chemical Corporation, Liquid Fuels Computer Center, 275 Winchester Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut The Prudential Insurance Company of America, Electronics Research Division, Prudential Plaza, Newark, New Jersey RCA Laboratories, Princeton, New Jersey RCA Service Company, BMEWS Project, Griffiss Air Force Base, Rome, New York Republic Aviation Corporation, Farmingdale, New York Shell Development Company, E and P Research, Computing Section, 3737 Bellaire Boulevard, Houston, Texas Socony Mobil Oil Company, Incorporated, 150 East 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. Standard Oil Company of California, Western Operations, Incorporated, 225 Bush Street, San Francisco, California New York Stock Exchange, Stock Clearing Corporation, 18 Broad Street, New York 5, N. Y. Sun 011 Company, Marcus Hook Refinery, Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania United Gas Corporation, 1525 Fairfield Avenue, Shreveport, Louisiana Following sub-divisions of United States Steel Corporation, 525 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh 30, Pennsylvania also operate IBM 650 Computers: American Bridge American Steel and Wire Columbia-Geneva Consolidated Western Oliver Iron Mining New York Data Processing Center Pittsburgh Data Processing Center Central Operations U. S. Steel Supply Universal Oil Products Company, 30 Algonquin Road, Des Plaines, Illinois Western Electric Company, 77 South Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois Western Electric Company, Allentown Works, 555 Union Boulevard, Allentown, Pennsylvania Western Electric Company, Data Processing & Methods Development Department, 2525 Shadeland Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Western Electric Company, Omaha Works, Box 1400, Peony Park Station, Omaha, Nebraska Western Electric Company, 3300 Lexington Road, S.E., Winston-Salem, North Carolina Auburn University, Computer Laboratory, Auburn, Alabama Brigham Young University, Computer Center, Provo, Utah Watson Scientific Computing Laboratory, 612 W. 16th Street, New York 27, N. Y. Colorado State University, Computing Center, Fort Collins, Colorado Columbia University, Electronics Research Laboratories, 632 West 125th Street, New York 27, N. Y. Columbia University, Hudson Laboratories, Dobbs Ferry, New York Columbia University, Nevis Cyclotron Laboratory, Box 137, Irvington on Hudson, New York Cornell University, Dairy Records Processing Laboratory, Ithaca, New York Florida State University, Computing Center, Tallahassee, Florida Georgia Institute of Technology, Rich Electronic Computer Center, Atlanta, Georgia Indiana University, Research Computing Center, Bloomington, Indiana Iowa State University, Statistical Laboratory, Ames, Iowa Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins Road, Scaggsville, Howard County, Maryland Louisiana State University, Computer Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Marquette University, Computing Center, 1515 W. Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin Miami University, Computing Center, Laws Hall, Oxford, Ohio Montana State College, Computer Laboratory, Bozeman, Montana New York University, Computation and Statistical Laboratory, Research Building 3, 233 Fordham Landing Road, New York 68, New York North Carolina State College, Experimental Statistics Department, Patterson Hall, Raleigh, North Carolina
BRL 1961, IBM 650 RAMAC, start page 0389
Oklahoma State University, Computing Center, Stillwater, Oklahoma Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 333 Jay Street, Brooklyn 1, N. Y. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Computer Labora- tory, Troy, New York Stanford University, Computation Center, Stanford, California Syracuse University, Computing Center, 112 Hinds Hall, Syracuse 10, New York Texas Engineering Experiment Station, Data Process- ing Center Building, College Station, Texas Tulane University, Computer Center, New Orleans 15, Louisiana University of Arizona, Numerical Analysis Labora- tory, Tucson 25, Arizona University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas University of California, Radiation Laboratory, Box 808, Livermore, California University of Florida, Statistical Laboratory, P. 0. Box 3568, University Station, Gainesville, Florida University of Georgia, Department of Experimental Statistics, Lumpkin House, Athens, Georgia University of Houston, Computing and Data Process- ing Center, Houston 4, Texas University of Kentucky, Computing Center, Lexing- ton, Kentucky University of Mississippi, Computer Center, Carrier Hall, University, Mississippi University of Rochester, Computing Center, Rochester, New York University of Southern California, Aerodynamic Test Laboratory, Building 75, U. S. Naval Missile Center, Point Mugu, California University of Wisconsin, Numerical Analysis Labora- tory, Sterling Hall, Madison 6, Wisconsin Vanderbilt University, Computer Center, Wesley Hall, Nashville, Tennessee Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Temporary Building 365, Blacksburg, Virginia Washington State University, Computing Center, Pullman, Washington Wayne State University, Computing Center, 4841 Cass Avenue, Detroit 2, Michigan Yale University, Computing Center, 135 Prospect Street, New Haven, Connecticut


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